US Constitution, Ready for Change

US Constitution, Ready for Change

Posted on November 6, 2016

 

We the People have seem to become a part of a war that we never intended to become a part of. The “War on Drugs” has deemed many of the citizens of the United States to be criminals for such a destructive substance known as “marijuana”. The Reefer Madness, propaganda campaign made famous by Harry Anslinger.

I have yet to find the evidence of the harm that I keep hearing this plant causes, but those looking to keep this plant from the people sure seem to use those same unfounded claims to continue the prohibition of this plant, in turn the prohibition of our rights. I wonder what would happen if we started calling it “CANNABIS” people would start to understand how they have been duped, by their own government since the 1930’s  about a plant that could literally change and help save the world.

time-to-take-it-back

Many years ago there was a document written that outlined specific rights of the people that were to be protected, not only from corporate structures but also limit the power of our government. The Constitution of the United States is missing one important detail, to outline the importance of keeping the cannabis plant in the hands of the people.

It looks like that may now be challenged and a proposal has been written, waiting for the right person to take hold and run with it to the national scene. Are you that person, or do you know that person? Have a look and share it with others if you think this is how it should be.

To hopefully become an initiative and later an amendment to the US Constitution:
“BEING NECESSARY TO THE HEALTH, SELF SUFFICIENCY AND SECURITY OF A FREE STATE, THE RIGHT OF THE PEOPLE TO ACCESS, KEEP, GROW AND CONSUME THE CANNABIS PLANT SHALL NOT BE INFRINGED.”

If you think it’s time for national change. Get involved. Make noise. Force the change you want. It is our right. Don’t let them take it away from us.

Gods Gift

Cannabis or calamus? What’s really in the bible?

Cannabis or calamus? What’s really in the bible?

Cannabis or calamus? What’s really in the bible?

 

Written by Pat and Lynn Kempen

How many times have you been told that the use or consumption of the cannabis plant is a sin or of the Devil? The next time someone says it’s the Devils weed, correct them, for they know not what they say.

Gen 1 29 label

With the Hebrew words for “calamus” and “cannabis” so similar, and the fact that calamus is of lesser value and also toxic, we must question the validity of the term “calamus” in English versions of Scripture. 

The word calamus is found in the KJV three times:
bibleExodus 30:23 God telling Moses the formula for the anointing oil (250 shekels worth.)
KJV-sweet calamus
NKJV-sweet-smelling cane
ESV-aromatic cane
NASB-fragrant cane
Song of Solomon 4:14, speaking of it in a refreshing garden
Ezekiel 27:19 speaking of cane as merchandise.

The KJV translates the Hebrew word “qaneh” (pronounced kaw-naw’) into “calamus.”  Per Strong’s Concordance, “qaneh” means “a reed (as erect); by resemblance a rod (especially for measuring) shaft, tube, stem, (the radius of the arm) beam (of a steelyard): – balance, bone, branch, calamus, cane, reed, spearman, stalk.”

The Hebrew word for “calamus” is “kanah bosm,” which is plural.  The singular for this is “kaneh bos,” which sounds remarkably close the modern word “cannabis.”

According to Webster’s New Hebrew dictionary, the current Hebrew word for cannabis is “kanabos.”
Thus, contentions that the KJV possibly interpreted the Hebrew word incorrectly as “calamus” warrant consideration.

Exodus 30If Exodus 30:23 is referring to a monetary value of calamus or cannabis, the “250 shekels” is approximately $125.00 worth (which is 2.5 cents/gerah X 20 gerahs/shekel X 250 shekels in Ex30:23) which is a considerable amount.
* Per the ATS Bible Dictionary (and others), a shekel is a term for either weight or currency (a coin.)  A shekel is worth 20 gerahs.  A gerah is the smallest weight or coin among the Jews, and worth about two and a half cents.

If the 250 shekels is referring to weight, instead of coinage, it is a considerable amount of whatever it is the KJV is referring to as “calamus.”

While cannabis is non-toxic (not a single death has ever been directly attributed to it, despite much effort being given to document such a fatality), calamus is most definitely a toxin. The FDA banned calamus from uses in food and medicines in 1968 as calamus contains more than 75% asarone.  Asarone is a poison which has been shown to cause cancer, and has ill effects on heart, liver and kidney functions.  This toxin in calamus is used for pest control.  Why would God specify a large quantity of a poison be used in holy anointing oil?

In 1936, Sula Benet, a Polish etymologist from the Institute of Anthropological Sciences in Warsaw revealed solid evidence of the Hebrew use of cannabis.  The word “cannabis had previously been thought to be of Scythian origin as Scythians first brought the plant to Europe, but Benet showed it has much earlier origin in Semitic languages like Hebrew. Sula Benet “In the original Hebrew text of the Old Testament there are references to hemp, both as incense, which was an integral part of religious celebration, and as an intoxicant.”  Benet demonstrated that the word for cannabis is “kaneh-bosm”, and in traditional Hebrew “kaneh” or “kannabus.”  The root “kan” here means “reed” or “hemp”, while “bosm” means “aromatic.”  This word appears five times in the Old Testament (Exodus, Song of Solomon, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel) and has been mistranslated as “calamus”, a common marsh plant with little monetary value that does not have the qualities or value ascribed to “kaneh-bosm.”  The error occurred in the oldest Greek translation of the Hebrew bible, the Septuagint in the 3rd century BC, and was repeated in translations that followed.

It is illogical to assume that a plant as important as cannabis, which is such an incredibly useful source of fiber for textiles, loaded with nutritive oils and medicinal properties while also being non-toxic and ridiculously easy to grow, would have gone unnoticed and would have been ignored by the Judaic religion.

With as many benefits (medicinal and utilitarian) that cannabis has to offer humanity, I contend humanity needs to expedite the end of prohibition of this non-toxic plant, and have it removed from the governments drug scheduling listing. There is no valid reason to have our brothers and sisters jailed for consuming this “NON-TOXIC” plant. There is no need to have lives ruined for trying to be healthy.

Bible-believers, specifically, need to thoroughly examine this issue in light of the etymology (the origin of a word and the historical development of its meaning), and the likelihood of mis-translation of “qenah” in the King James Version. WHAT IF God intended cannabis (as opposed to calamus) to be part of the anointing oil?

admit1

What do you truly know about this plant?

It’s time we talk about this. 

For more information or to get involved, please contact us at hempenkempens@gmail.com or join us on facebook atMissouri Christians and Cannabis or Hempeneers United.

Join the discussion @ http://christianchat.com/bible-discussion-forum/143073-calamus-cannabis-anointing-oil.html#post2835669

Duped by Idiocracy: Christians, Cannabis, and Trusting the Government to Define Morality

Duped by Idiocracy: Christians, Cannabis, and Trusting the Government to Define Morality

Written by Ruth,
I’ve recently introduced my husband to a frightening documentary which told of a society in which a giant corporation had purchased multiple government agencies and thus was able to convince the people to subsist solely on this corporation’s manufactured product.  Believing that water was fit only for their toilets, the citizens of future America poisoned themselves and everything else by replacing water with Brawndo, “The Thirst Mutilator.”  Fortunately, a man who had been placed – and abandoned – in suspended animation five-hundred years prior suddenly awoke and managed to convince the citizens to water their crops with…well, water…and the people were saved from starvation.

I am, of course, referring to the 2006 film Idiocracy.  While watching it, one can’t help but chuckle and wonder what kind of IDIOTS would ever believe that they should replace all-natural water with a sports drink that happens to own the FDA, the FCC, and the USDA.  And yet here we are in a country in which the National Guard and State Police raid little old grannies with a helicopter in order to seize her single medicinal plant.  A country in which Americans don’t think twice before washing down their prescription pills with a Miller Light, or five, but haul out the pitchforks over their pot-smoking neighbors.  It’s a country in which doctors routinely over-prescribe opioids and set their patients on the path to heroin addiction. A country in which our police systematically hunt and destroy plants which not too long ago were valued for their many industrial and medicinal uses.  A country with an astronomical incarceration rate because it sentences men and women to prison for nonviolent, victimless crimes.

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It’s not difficult to imagine the idiots of future America making the argument: “I believe what the government is saying about water.  I’ve seen the dangers of water firsthand and I’ve heard horror stories involving water.  Not only do scores of people drown in water, but I’ve even heard of people who have died from drinking too much water.  If water is too hot, it can scald you or boil the flesh off your bones.  If it’s too cold, you could get hypothermia and freeze to death.  Also, a lot of water is teeming with toxic chemicals and dangerous microbes.  It is better not to take the risk.  Also, a lot of people have abused water – they use WAY more than they actually need.  Some people even use it just for fun and invent new ways of using it, like scuba diving and water skiing, frittering away their time and their money on this liquid death.”

“But, Ruth, people need water to survive.  Our bodies are made of mostly water.  We will actually die if we do not have water.  Your analogy is stupid.”

To that I would respond: we all actually also need cannabinoids, and for some people an external source of cannabinoids is the difference between life and death.  They can shrink tumors and fight cancer; they can effectively treat epilepsy and alzheimers.  For many others, cannabinoids are the difference between thriving and merely existing.  They ease chronic pain, they stimulate the appetite and help the ill to consume the energy they require to fight their illness, and they ameliorate anxiety and depression.  What is stupid is to be afraid of a substance and ignore its beneficial uses because some people have abused it, or because the idea of smoking a medication seems wrong to you, or because it has intoxicating effects.

“But It’s a Sin to Become Intoxicated”

It is a sin to become “intoxicated” for the sole purpose of being “intoxicated,” unless by “intoxication” we mean pain relief or an elevation of mood for the depressive or an easing of anxiety for the anxious.  For some, such as those suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, that “intoxication” is therapeutic, and it isn’t any more sinful to be “intoxicated” in this way than it is to be “intoxicated” from taking prescription antidepressants or anxiolytics.  For others, that “intoxication” is a side effect of their medicine, and it isn’t any more sinful than being “intoxicated” from taking prescription opioids as directed.  As the pill bottles warn, “Do not drive, operate heavy machinery, or do other dangerous activities until you know how this medication affects you.”  The same principle applies to cannabis.

As with any drug, there are pros and cons to using cannabis which must be weighed by each individual.  As we do with many other medications our doctors prescribe, we have to first try a drug to see how it affects us – whether or not we feel it is beneficial in treating the ailment it was prescribed to treat, and whether those benefits outweigh any negative side effects.

And in a market saturated with medications offering such potential side effects as hallucinations, “overpowering urges,” an inability to control bowel movements, benign or malignant liver tumors, fatal bleeding, dizziness, lightheadedness, coma, nausea or vomiting, seizures, severe pain, paralysis, massive weight gain, stroke, depression, suicidal thoughts and actions, and death, just to name a few, cannabis emerges as a natural and viable alternative.  It also happens to be far less addictive than prescription opioids and has a much higher safety profile than even Tylenol.

st-gods

Yet many well-meaning Christians insist on applying a unique set of standards to cannabis which define any use as “abuse” and which define experiencing the effects of cannabis, no matter how mildly or medicinally, as “intoxication.”  This is based on a belief that any use of this particular plant is disordered, wrong, or “sinful” in and of itself.  But then perhaps drinking coffee is sinful because we want to feel the effects of caffeine, just as it is sinful to drink a glass of wine to feel its relaxing effects, as Mormons believe.  Perhaps taking ibuprofen to feel its pain relieving effects is sinful, as is taking Benadryl or NyQuil as a sleep aid.

On the contrary, I don’t believe it is inherently sinful to responsibly use a substance in order to feel relaxed or alert or to lessen physical pain.  If that is really what we believe, then we’ve falen into gnosticism.

Some early and medieval Christian ascetics, in fact, believed it was sinful to seek pleasure or comfort from food or drink, and so they starved themselves or ate unappetizing food, and only what was enough to sustain them.  Some also wore hairshirts in order to cause themselves constant discomfort.  And of course, they abstained from marriage and therefore any sexual contact.  Do you believe it is wrong to guzzle your water or eat beyond what you actually need, to enjoy a steak or ice cream, or to wear comfortable clothes and a good pair of running shoes?  If not, then stop pretending to be the ascetic you’re not.  Admit that you believe God created some things for our enjoyment and some things to improve our lives.

Just as we do, or ought to do, with everything else, it makes more sense to work to discover the properly ordered use of cannabis than to condemn it altogether.  And I honestly do not believe that I am arguing for Christians to figure out how to properly-order something that is inherently disordered, such as homosexual sex or transgenderism, greed or wrath, envy or vanity, gluttony, lust, pride, or idolatry.  I’m not talking about squaring a circle or inventing my own morality and my own god.

In my most recent post, I argued that in general, cannabis use isn’t “bad” or “sinful” in and of itself, and that a Christian may use cannabis with a clean conscience.  Drawing from several biblical passages and, I hope, staying true to their intent, I argued that cannabis is essentially “good,” as it is part of God’s creation.  It seems obvious to me that, like all other plants and animals, God placed cannabis under the dominion of mankind, to use according to our discretion.

Because cannabis isn’t poisonous and is extremely safe to use – rather, it possesses the ability to confer a multitude of benefits upon the user – precisely because it works in conjunction with the mammalian endogenous cannabinoid system, we can infer that God intended cannabis for human (and even animal) consumption.

At the same time, however, I pointed out that cannabis use for the Christian can be sinful if it is offensive to other believers and causes them to sin, or if it gets in the way of attracting converts to Christ (1 Cor 10:23-33).  It is also sinful to use cannabis if the user is acting against his own conscience in using it: if he believes it is a sin to use it and uses it anyway, then he sins in his heart (Rom 14:14-23).

Cannabis and the Law of the State

Given the above understanding of scripture, must we conclude that in a state where cannabis is still illegal, a Christian should probably not be using cannabis – not because the law in particular is good, but because it is sinful to risk the scandal of being arrested for possession?  I would not go so far as to say that the law ought to be obeyed because it was instituted by authorities which have been appointed by God (Rom 13:1-7).  As Dr. Norman Horn of the Libertarian Christian Institute has written in his article “New Testament Theology of the State,”

Submission to civil government, then, is always qualified. The command is …

Read more @ Duped by Idiocracy: Christians, Cannabis, and Trusting the Government to Define Morality

What’s In Popeye’s Pipe? | The Hempeneer

The world’s most famous sailor-man may be tooting more than just spinach in his pipe.

Source: What’s In Popeye’s Pipe? | Alternet

Popeye is one of the world’s most well-known and beloved animated characters. Since his creation, the pipe-puffing Popeye has become a global phenomenon, with millions of kids heartily munching on spinach in the hopes that it will make them as strong as the legendary sailor-man.

popeyeYet is the spinach which gives Popeye his super-strength really a metaphor for another magical herb? Have children around the world been adoring a hero who is really a heavy consumer of the forbidden weed – marijuana?

The evidence is circumstantial, but it is there, and when added together it presents a compelling picture that, for many readers at least, Popeye’s strength-giving spinach is meant as a clear metaphor for the miraculous powers of marijuana.

Comic Creation

Popeye has gone through many different writers and artists since he was first created in 1929 by cartoonist Elzie Segar. Popeye was originally introduced as a minor character in Segar’s ongoing comic strip, Thimble Theatre. For 10 years Segar had been chronicling the adventures of Olive Oyl, her brother Castor, and her fiance Ham Gravy. At the start of one new adventure, Castor and Ham were to embark on an overseas voyage, and so they went to the docks and hired a sailor named Popeye.

Soon Popeye had become a major part of the Thimble Theatre cast, and within a year Ham Gravy was written out of the strip as Popeye replaced him as Olive’s sweetheart. Wimpy was added to the cast three years later, and baby Swee’pea four years after that.

At first there was no explanation for Popeye’s amazing strength. But within a few years Popeye’s reliance on spinach was entrenched in the strip, and the basis of some ongoing jokes. By the time of the animated cartoons, decades after Segar’s death, the spinach had become an essential part of every plot, with Popeye’s consumption of the magic herb signaling a swift end to his foes.

The original comic by Segar was much more complex and nuanced than the later animated shorts. Segar introduced many strange and wonderful characters into Popeye’s world, including the malicious Sea Hag, whose enchanted flute enables her to fly and do magic; the wealthy Mr. Vanripple, whose beautiful daughter June rivals Olive for Popeye’ affections; the disturbing Alice the Goon who speaks only in squiggles; and the mighty Toar, whose monstrous strength challenges even Popeye’s.

Segar’s storylines were full of adult humor, including Toar having a crush on Popeye, calling him “hot stuff” and kissing him on the head. Popeye’s ongoing adventures included founding his own island nation called Spinachovia, and becoming “dictipator” over a country made up only of men.

Spinach = Marijuana

 

During the 1920s and ’30s, the era when Popeye was created, “spinach” was a very common code word for marijuana. One classic example is “The Spinach Song,” recorded in 1938 by the popular jazz band Julia Lee and Her Boyfriends. Performed for years in clubs thick with cannabis smoke, along with other Julia Lee hits like “Sweet Marijuana,” the popular song used spinach as an obvious metaphor for pot.

In addition, anti-marijuana propaganda of the time claimed that marijuana use induced super-strength. Overblown media reports proclaimed that pot smokers became extraordinarily strong, and even immune to bullets. So tying in Popeye’s mighty strength with his sucking back some spinach would have seemed like an obvious cannabis connection at the time.

Further, as a “sailor-man,” Popeye would be expected to be familiar with exotic herbs from distant locales. Indeed, sailors were among the first to introduce marijuana to American culture, bringing the herb back with them from their voyages overseas.

Segar did make other, more explicit drug references in his comic strip. One ongoing 1934 plotline had Vanripple’s gold mine facing corrupt, thieving workers. Popeye discovers that the mine manager is feeding his men berries from a bush whose roots are soaked in a nasty drug. Consuming the drugged berries removes human conscience, making people more violent and willing to commit crime.

Popeye falls under the influence of the laced berries and becomes surly and mean, striking out at his friends and allies. Yet he still manages to get five gallons of “myrtholene,” a joy-inducing drug which he pours over the plant’s roots. The new berries produce delirious happiness, and as Popeye says, “When a man’s happy he jus’ couldn’t do nothin’ wrong.”

Pot References

Segar died in 1938, and the strip was taken over by others in the following decades. As the Popeye character was re-interpreted by others in print, animation and film, other indicators of a marijuana subtext have continued to pop up.

For example, in many of the animated Popeye cartoons from the 1960s, Popeye is explicitly shown sucking the power-giving spinach through his pipe.

Further, in the comics and cartoons made during the ’60s, Popeye had a dog named Birdseed. Surely the writers who named Popeye’s dog during this “flower power” era were aware that cannabis was in fact America’s number one source of birdseed until it was banned?

Another slightly different drug reference occurs in the 1954 cartoon, Greek Mirthology. In the cartoon, Popeye tells his nephews the story of his ancestor, Hercules. Hercules, who looks just like Popeye, is shown sniffing white garlic to gain his super strength. By the end of the cartoon Hercules has discovered spinach and switches over to it. Is this a metaphor for the benefits of cannabis over cocaine or snuff?

Another animated film shows Popeye carefully tending a crop of spinach plants reminiscent of a cannabis patch. He carefully takes cuttings, dips them into rooting gel and plants them in his outdoor garden. He even gives each plant a special feeding mix from a baby bottle. Pot growers worldwide would recognize the unique way that Popeye cares for his sacred crop.

I Yam What I Yam

Some have commented on the parallel between Popeye’s famous phrase, “I yam what I yam,” and the statement, “I am that I am,” made by God to Moses in the Old Testament. In the story, God speaks to Moses through a magical burning bush, which was not consumed by the fire. Many different people and faiths, including Rastafarians and various early Christian sects, have believed that the biblical burning bush is a reference to the cannabis plant.

So in this context, the use of phrase, “I yam what I yam,” can be seen as a reference to Popeye’s use of the burning cannabis bush, which creates his higher awareness of the self-reflective nature of the Godhead.

Pure Bolivian Spinach

The only Popeye strip to ever explicitly refer to the pot/spinach connection was published in the 1980s by illustrator Bobby London. The comic showed Popeye and Wimpy picking up a load of “pure Bolivian spinach.”

London did the syndicated Popeye daily strip for King Features from 1986 to 1992, and was known for putting adult, controversial themes into his work. He had previously worked on the short-lived comic book Air Pirates, which showed Mickey and Minnie Mouse having sex, getting high and smuggling drugs.

London was eventually fired from Popeye for writing an allegorical satire about the abortion issue. No new Popeye strips are now being written; those running in daily newspapers are all repeats.

Popeye Mythology

Whether Popeye ‘s many pot references are intentional or not, some see amazing depths and layers of meaning within the Popeye saga. An author and online artist named Michaelm provides the following analysis:

“Popeye characterizes the natural cycle going back through the ages to the ancient mariners … books, [B]ibles, logs, maps, pennants, sails, ropes, paints, varnishes, lamp oil and sealants were all derived from hemp. Bluto represents the greedy toxic corporations, dependent industries and landowners.

“Both characters try to swoon the premier oil source, Olive Oyl. Bluto begins to understand Popeye is too competitive so he decides to eliminate him. He chains Popeye down, captures Olive Oyl, and approaches the point of rape. But in the end Popeye manages to suck the ‘spinach’ through his pipe, grows strong with hemp, breaks free and defeats the evil corporations, saving her from industrial pollution and oppression.

“Relieved and happy, she gives herself back to the natural cycle, then Popeye smiles, winks and toots his pipe.”

While this is likely reading far more into the strip than any of its creators ever intended, it is an excellent example of the iconic status that Popeye has achieved among some quarters of the cannabis community.

Dana Larsen is the editor of Cannabis Culture, which is based in Vancouver B.C.

Source: What’s In Popeye’s Pipe? | The Hempeneer

The Marijuana Conspiracy – The Real Reason Hemp is Illegal

The Marijuana Conspiracy – The Real Reason Hemp is Illegal

The Marijuana Conspiracy – The Real Reason Hemp is Illegal
by Doug Yurchey, June 15, 2005 

NOTE TO THE READER: Words and sentences within this type of brackets [ ] are not part of the original article!

And I will raise up for them a plant of renown, and they shall be no more consumed with hunger in the land.– Ezekiel 34/29

THE REAL REASON CANNABIS HAS BEEN OUTLAWED HAS NOTHING
TO DO WITH ITS EFFECTS ON THE MIND AND BODY.

 marimoney

MARIJUANA is DANGEROUS.

Pot is NOT harmful to the human body or mind. Marijuana does NOT pose a threat to the general public. Marijuana is very much a danger to the oil companies, alcohol, tobacco industries and a large number of chemical corporations. Various big businesses, with plenty of dollars and influence, have suppressed the truth from the people.

The truth is if marijuana was utilized for its vast array of commercial products, it would create an industrial atomic bomb! Entrepreneurs have not been educated on the product potential of pot. The super rich have conspired to spread misinformation about an extremely versatile plant that, if used properly, would ruin their companies.

Where did the word ‘marijuana’ come from? In the mid 1930s, the M-word was created to tarnish the good image and phenomenal history of the hemp plant…as you will read. The facts cited here, with references, are generally verifiable in the Encyclopedia Britannica which was printed on hemp paper for 150 years:

* All schoolbooks were made from hemp or flax paper until the 1880s; Hemp Paper Reconsidered, Jack Frazier, 1974.

* It was LEGAL TO PAY TAXES WITH HEMP in America from 1631 until the early 1800s; LA Times, Aug. 12, 1981.

* REFUSING TO GROW HEMP in America during the 17th and 18th Centuries WAS AGAINST THE LAW! You could be jailed in Virginia for refusing to grow hemp from 1763 to 1769; Hemp in Colonial Virginia, G. M. Herdon.

George* George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and other founding fathers GREW HEMP; Washington and Jefferson Diaries. Jefferson smuggled hemp seeds from China to France then to America.

* Benjamin Franklin owned one of the first paper mills in America and it processed hemp. Also, the War of 1812 was fought over hemp. Napoleon wanted to cut off Moscow’s export to England; Emperor Wears No Clothes, Jack Herer.

* For thousands of years, 90% of all ships’ sails and rope were made from hemp. The word ‘canvas’ is Dutch for cannabis; Webster’s New World Dictionary.

* 80% of all textiles, fabrics, clothes, linen, drapes, bed sheets, etc. were made from hemp until the 1820s with the introduction of the cotton gin.

* The first Bibles, maps, charts, Betsy Ross’s flag, the first drafts of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution were made from hemp; U.S. Government Archives.

* The first crop grown in many states was hemp. 1850 was a peak year for Kentucky producing 40,000 tons. Hemp was the largest cash crop until the 20th Century; State Archives.

* Oldest known records of hemp farming go back 5000 years in China, although hemp industrialization probably goes back to ancient Egypt.

* Rembrants, Gainsboroughs, Van Goghs as well as most early canvas paintings were principally painted on hemp linen.

* In 1916, the U.S. Government predicted that by the 1940s all paper would come from hemp and that no more trees need to be cut down. Government studies report that 1 acre of hemp equals 4.1 acres of trees. Plans were in the works to implement such programs; Department of Agriculture

* Quality paints and varnishes were made from hemp seed oil until 1937. 58,000 tons of hemp seeds were used in America for paint products in 1935; Sherman Williams Paint Co. testimony before Congress against the 1937 Marijuana Tax Act.

* Henry Ford’s first Model-T was built to run on hemp gasoline and the CAR ITSELF WAS CONTRUCTED FROM HEMP! On his large estate, Ford was photographed among his hemp fields. The car, ‘grown from the soil,’ had hemp plastic panels whose impact strength was 10 times stronger than steel; Popular Mechanics, 1941.

* Hemp called ‘Billion Dollar Crop.’ It was the first time a cash crop had a business potential to exceed a billion dollars; Popular Mechanics, Feb., 1938.

* Mechanical Engineering Magazine (Feb. 1938) published an article entitled ‘The Most Profitable and Desirable Crop that Can be Grown.’ It stated that if hemp was cultivated using 20th Century technology, it would be the single largest agricultural crop in the U.S. and the rest of the world.

The following information comes directly from the United States Department of Agriculture’s 1942 14-minute film encouraging and instructing ‘patriotic American farmers’ to grow 350,000 acres of hemp each year for the war effort:

‘…(When) Grecian temples were new, hemp was already old in the service of mankind. For thousands of years, even then, this plant had been grown for cordage and cloth in China and elsewhere in the East. For centuries prior to about 1850, all the ships that sailed the western seas were rigged with hempen rope and sails. For the sailor, no less than the hangman, hemp was indispensable…

…Now with Philippine and East Indian sources of hemp in the hands of the Japanese…American hemp must meet the needs of our Army and Navy as well as of our industries…

…the Navy’s rapidly dwindling reserves. When that is gone, American hemp will go on duty again; hemp for mooring ships; hemp for tow lines; hemp for tackle and gear; hemp for countless naval uses both on ship and shore. Just as in the days when Old Ironsides sailed the seas victorious with her hempen shrouds and hempen sails. Hemp for victory!’

Certified proof from the Library of Congress; found by the research of Jack Herer, refuting claims of other government agencies that the 1942 USDA film ‘Hemp for Victory’ did not exist.

1cannabisHemp cultivation and production do not harm the environment. The USDA Bulletin #404 concluded that hemp produces 4 times as much pulp with at least 4 to 7 times less pollution. From Popular Mechanics, Feb. 1938:

‘It has a short growing season…It can be grown in any state…The long roots penetrate and break the soil to leave it in perfect condition for the next year’s crop. The dense shock of leaves, 8 to 12 feet above the ground, chokes out weeds.
…hemp, this new crop can add immeasurably to American agriculture and industry.’

In the 1930s, innovations in farm machinery would have caused an industrial revolution when applied to hemp. This single resource could have created millions of new jobs generating thousands of quality products. Hemp, if not made illegal, would have brought America out of the Great Depression.

William Randolph Hearst (Citizen Kane) and the Hearst Paper Manufacturing Division of Kimberly Clark owned vast acreage of timberlands. The Hearst Company supplied most paper products. Patty Hearst’s grandfather, a destroyer of nature for his own personal profit, stood to lose billions because of hemp.

In 1937, Dupont patented the processes to make plastics from oil and coal. Dupont’s Annual Report urged stockholders to invest in its new petrochemical division. Synthetics such as plastics, cellophane, celluloid, methanol, nylon, rayon, Dacron, etc., could now be made from oil. Natural hemp industrialization would have ruined over 80% of Dupont’s business.
THE CONSPIRACY

Andrew Mellon became Hoover’s Secretary of the Treasury and Dupont’s primary investor. He appointed his future nephew-in-law, Harry J. Anslinger, to head the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs.

Secret meetings were held by these financial tycoons. Hemp was declared dangerous and a threat to their billion dollar enterprises. For their dynasties to remain intact, hemp had to go. These men took an obscure Mexican slang word: ‘marihuana’ and pushed it into the consciousness of America.
MEDIA MANIPULATION

A media blitz of ‘yellow journalism’ raged in the late 1920s and 1930s. Hearst’s newspapers ran stories emphasizing the horrors of marihuana. The menace of marihuana made headlines. Readers learned that it was responsible for everything from car accidents to loose morality.

Films like ‘Reefer Madness’ (1936), ‘Marihuana: Assassin of Youth’ (1935) and ‘Marihuana: The Devil’s Weed’ (1936) were propaganda designed by these industrialists to create an enemy. Their purpose was to gain public support so that anti-marihuana laws could be passed.

Examine the following quotes from ‘The Burning Question’ aka REEFER MADNESS:

  • a violent narcotic.
  • acts of shocking violence.
  • incurable insanity.
  • soul-destroying effects.
  • under the influence of the drug he killed his entire family with an ax.
  • more vicious, more deadly even than these soul-destroying drugs (heroin, cocaine) is the menace of marihuana!

Reefer Madness did not end with the usual ‘the end.’ The film concluded with these words plastered on the screen: TELL YOUR CHILDREN.

In the 1930s, people were very naive; even to the point of ignorance. The masses were like sheep waiting to be led by the few in power. They did not challenge authority. If the news was in print or on the radio, they believed it had to be true. They told their children and their children grew up to be the parents of the baby-boomers.

On April 14, 1937, the Prohibitive Marihuana Tax Law or the bill that outlawed hemp was directly brought to the House Ways and Means Committee. This committee is the only one that can introduce a bill to the House floor without it being debated by other committees. The Chairman of the Ways and Means, Robert Doughton, was a Dupont supporter. He insured that the bill would pass Congress.

Dr. James Woodward, a physician and attorney, testified too late on behalf of the American Medical Association. He told the committee that the reason the AMA had not denounced the Marihuana Tax Law sooner was that the Association had just discovered that marihuana was hemp.

Few people, at the time, realized that the deadly menace they had been reading about on Hearst’s front pages was in fact passive hemp. The AMA understood cannabis to be a MEDICINE found in numerous healing products sold over the last hundred years.

In September of 1937, hemp became illegal. The most useful crop known became a drug and our planet has been suffering ever since.

hemp plantCongress banned hemp because it was said to be the most violence-causing drug known. Anslinger, head of the Drug Commission for 31 years, promoted the idea that marihuana made users act extremely violent. In the 1950s, under the Communist threat of McCarthyism, Anslinger now said the exact opposite. Marijuana will pacify you so much that soldiers would not want to fight.
Today, our planet is in desperate trouble. Earth is suffocating as large tracts of rain forests disappear. Pollution, poisons and chemicals are killing people. These great problems could be reversed if we industrialized hemp. Natural biomass could provide all of the planet’s energy needs that are currently supplied by fossil fuels. We have consumed 80% of our oil and gas reserves. We need a renewable resource. Hemp could be the solution to soaring gas prices.
 

THE WONDER PLANT

Hemp has a higher quality fiber than wood fiber. Far fewer caustic chemicals are required to make paper from hemp than from trees. Hemp paper does not turn yellow and is very durable. The plant grows quickly to maturity in a season where trees take a lifetime.

ALL PLASTIC PRODUCTS SHOULD BE MADE FROM HEMP SEED OIL. Hempen plastics are biodegradable! Over time, they would break down and not harm the environment. Oil-based plastics, the ones we are very familiar with, help ruin nature; they do not break down and will do great harm in the future. The process to produce the vast array of natural (hempen) plastics will not ruin the rivers as Dupont and other petrochemical companies have done. Ecology does not fit in with the plans of the Oil Industry and the political machine. Hemp products are safe and natural.

MEDICINES SHOULD BE MADE FROM HEMP. We should go back to the days when the AMA supported cannabis cures. ‘Medical Marijuana’ is given out legally to only a handful of people while the rest of us are forced into a system that relies on chemicals. Pot is only healthy for the human body.

WORLD HUNGER COULD END. A large variety of food products can be generated from hemp. The seeds contain one of the highest sources of protein in nature. ALSO: They have two essential fatty acids that clean your body of cholesterol. These essential fatty acids are not found anywhere else in nature! Consuming pot seeds is the best thing you could do for your body. Eat uncooked hemp seeds.

CLOTHES SHOULD BE MADE FROM HEMP. Hemp clothing is extremely strong and durable over time. You could hand clothing, made from pot, down to your grandchildren. Today, there are American companies that make hemp clothing; usually 50% hemp. Hemp fabrics should be everywhere. Instead, they are almost underground. Superior hemp products are not allowed to advertise on fascist television. Kentucky, once the top hemp producing state, made it ILLEGAL TO WEAR hemp clothing! Can you imagine being thrown into jail for wearing quality jeans?

The world is crazy…but that does not mean you have to join the insanity. Get together. Spread the news. Tell people, and that includes your children, the truth. Use hemp products. Eliminate the word ‘marijuana.’ Realize the history that created it. Make it politically incorrect to say or print the M-word. Fight against the propaganda (designed to favor the agenda of the super rich) and the bullshit. Hemp must be utilized in the future. We need a clean energy source to save our planet. INDUSTRIALIZE HEMP!

The liquor, tobacco and oil companies fund more than a million dollars a day to Partnership for a Drug-Free America and other similar agencies. We have all seen their commercials. Now, their motto is: ‘It’s more dangerous than we thought.’ Lies from the powerful corporations, that began with Hearst, are still alive and well today.

The brainwashing continues. Now, the commercials say: If you buy a joint, you contribute to murders and gang wars. The latest anti-pot commercials say: If you buy a joint…you are promoting TERRORISM! The new enemy (terrorism) has paved the road to brainwash you any way THEY see fit.

JoeThere is only one enemy; the friendly people you pay your taxes to; the war-makers and nature destroyers. With your funding, they are killing the world right in front of your eyes. HALF A MILLION DEATHS EACH YEAR ARE CAUSED BY TOBACCO. HALF A MILLION DEATHS EACH YEAR ARE CAUSED BY ALCOHOL. NO ONE HAS EVER, EVER DIED FROM SMOKING POT!! In the entire history of the human race, not one death can be attributed to cannabis. Our society has outlawed grass but condones the use of the KILLERS: TOBACCO and ALCOHOL. Hemp should be declassified and placed in DRUG stores to relieve stress. Hardening and constriction of the arteries are bad; but hemp usage actually enlarges the arteries…which is a healthy condition. We have been so conditioned to think that: Smoking is harmful. That is NOT the case for passive pot.

Ingesting THC, hemp’s active agent, has a positive effect; relieving asthma and glaucoma. A joint tends to alleviate the nausea caused by chemotherapy. You are able to eat on hemp. This is a healthy state of being.

(One personal note: During the pregnancy of my wife, she was having some difficulty gaining weight. We were in the hospital. A nurse called us to one side and said: ‘Off the record, if you smoke pot…you’d get something called the munchies and you’ll gain weight.’ I swear that is a true story). [Using Medifast coupons to counteract the results of the weight gain later on is a different story.]

The stereotype for a pothead is similar to a drunk, bubble-brain. Yet, the truth is one’s creative abilities can be enhanced under its influence. The perception of time slightly slows and one can become more sensitive. You can more appreciate all arts; be closer to nature and generally FEEL more under the influence of cannabis. It is, in fact, the exact opposite state of mind and body as the drunken state. You can be more aware with pot.

The pot plant is an ALIEN plant. There is physical evidence that cannabis is not like any other plant on this planet. One could conclude that it was brought here for the benefit of humanity. Hemp is the ONLY plant where the males appear one way and the females appear very different, physically! No one ever speaks of males and females in regard to the plant kingdom because plants do not show their sexes; except for cannabis. To determine what sex a certain, normal, Earthly plant is: You have to look internally, at its DNA. A male blade of grass (physically) looks exactly like a female blade of grass. The hemp plant has an intense sexuallity. Growers know to kill the males before they fertilize the females. Yes, folks…the most potent pot comes from ‘horny females.’

The reason this amazing, very sophisticated, ET plant from the future is illegal has nothing to do with how it physically affects us…..

…POT IS ILLEGAL BECAUSE BILLIONAIRES WANT TO REMAIN BILLIONAIRES!

dareps: I think the word ‘DRUGS’ should not be used as an umbrella-word that covers all chemical agents. Drugs have come to be known as something BAD. Are you aware there are LEGAL drugstores?! Yep, in every city. Unbelievable. Each so-called drug should be considered individually. Cannabis is a medicine and not a drug. We should DARE to speak the TRUTH no matter what the law is.

Also read Doug Yurchey’s follow-up article, “Marijuana Conspiracy – the Sequel” here at the Illuminati News website.

Everything you wanted to know about Cannabis/Hemp. (almost)

Everything you wanted to know about Cannabis/Hemp. (almost)

Don’t you wish there was a place you could go and learn about the cannabis/hemp plant that had links and access prepared for you to start learning about the most valuable resource Yahweh put on this earth(arguably, other than humans)?

Basic Data and Uses

1cannabis.png1. (Description and Uses of Hemp Hurds, Bast Fibers, and Seed Oil) “Industrial hemp can be grown as a fiber, seed, or dual-purpose crop.14 The interior of the stalk has short woody fibers called hurds; the outer portion has long bast fibers. Hemp seed/grains are smooth and about one-eighth to one-fourth of an inch long.15
“Although hemp is not grown in the United States, both finished hemp products and raw material inputs are imported and sold for use in manufacturing for a wide range of product categories (Figure 2). Hemp fibers are used in a wide range of products, including fabrics and textiles, yarns and spun fibers, paper, carpeting, home furnishings, construction and insulation materials, auto parts, and composites. Hurds are used in various applications such as animal bedding, material inputs, papermaking, and composites. Hemp seed and oilcake are used in a range of foods and beverages, and can be an alternative food protein source. Oil from the crushed hemp seed is used as an ingredient in a range of body-care products and nutritional supplements.16 Hemp seed is also used for industrial oils, cosmetics and personal care products, and pharmaceuticals, among other composites.”

Source:
Johnson, Renée, “Hemp As An Agricultural Commodity,” Congressional Research Service (Washington, DC: Library of Congress, Feb. 14, 2014), pp. 4-5.
http://www.votehemp.com/PDF/RL32725-20140214.pdf

2. (Estimated Retail US Hemp Market Size and Value) “There is no official estimate of the value of U.S. sales of hemp-based products. The Hemp Industries Association (HIA) estimates that the total U.S. retail value of hemp products in 2012 was nearly $500 million, which includes food and body products, clothing, auto parts, building materials and other products.20 Of this, HIA reports that the value of hemp-based food, supplements, and body care sales in the United States is about $156 million to $171 million annually. Previous reports about the size of the U.S. market for hemp clothing and textiles is estimated at about $100 million annually.21
“The reported retail value of the U.S. hemp market is an estimate and is difficult to verify. Underlying data for this estimate are from SPINS survey data;22 however, because the data reportedly do not track retail sales for The Body Shop and Whole Foods Market—two major markets for hemp-based products—as well as for restaurants, hemp industry analysts have adjusted these upward to account for this gap in the reported survey data.23
“Available industry information indicates that sales of some hemp-based products, such as foods and body care products, is growing.24 Growth in hemp specialty food products is driven, in part, by sales of hemp milk and related dairy alternatives, among other hemp-based foods.25
“Information is not available on other potential U.S. hemp-based sectors, such as for use in construction materials or biofuels, paper, and other manufacturing uses. Data are not available on existing businesses or processing facilities that may presently be engaged in such activities within the United States.”

Source:
Johnson, Renée, “Hemp As An Agricultural Commodity,” Congressional Research Service (Washington, DC: Library of Congress, Feb. 14, 2014), p. 6.
http://www.votehemp.com/PDF/RL32725-20140214.pdf

3. (Restrictions Against Federal Interference With State-Authorized Hemp Production Pilot Programs) The federal budget bill for FY2015 contains this provision:
“SEC. 539. None of the funds made available by this Act may be used in contravention of section 7606 (‘Legitimacy of Industrial Hemp Research’) of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (Public Law 113–79) by the Department of Justice or the Drug Enforcement Administration.”

Source:
“Consolidated and Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 2015,” US Congress, Enrolled Bill Published December 17, 2014, p. 88.
https://www.congress.gov/113/bills/hr83/BILLS-113hr83enr.pdf

4. (Hemp vs. Marijuana) “There are many different varieties of cannabis plants. Marijuana and hemp come from the same species of plant, Cannabis sativa, but from different varieties or cultivars. However, hemp is genetically different and is distinguished by its use and chemical makeup, as well as by differing cultivation practices in its production.2
“Hemp, also called ‘industrial hemp,’3 refers to cannabis varieties that are primarily grown as an agricultural crop (such as seeds and fiber, and byproducts such as oil, seed cake, hurds) and is characterized by plants that are low in THC (delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol, marijuana’s Marijuana refers to the flowering tops and leaves of psychoactive cannabis varieties, which are grown for their high content of THC. Marijuana’s high THC content is primarily in the flowering tops and to a lesser extent in the leaves. THC levels for marijuana are much higher than for hemp, and are reported to average about 10%; some sample tests indicate THC levels reaching 20%-30%, or greater.4
“A level of about 1% THC is considered the threshold for cannabis to have a psychotropic effect or an intoxicating potential.5 Current laws regulating hemp cultivation in the European Union (EU) and Canada use 0.3% THC as the dividing line between industrial and potentially drug-producing cannabis. Cultivars having less than 0.3% THC can be cultivated under license, while cultivars having more than that amount are considered to have too high a drug potential.6
“Some also claim that industrial hemp has higher levels of cannabidiol (CBD), the non-psychoactive part of marijuana, which might mitigate some of the effects of THC.7 A high ratio of CBD to THC might also classify hemp as a fiber-type plant rather than a drug-type plant. However, opinions are still mixed about how CBD levels might influence the psychoactive effects of THC.”

Source:
Johnson, Renée, “Hemp As An Agricultural Commodity,” Congressional Research Service (Washington, DC: Library of Congress, July 24, 2013), pp. 1-2.
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL32725.pdf

5. (US Hemp Imports) “The import value of hemp-based products imported and sold in the United States is difficult to estimate accurately. For some traded products, available statistics have only limited breakouts or have been expanded only recently to capture hemp subcategories within the broader trade categories for oilseeds and fibers. Reporting errors are evident in some of the trade data, since reported export data for hemp from Canada do not consistently match reported U.S. import data for the same products (especially for hemp seeds).
“Given these data limitations, available trade statistics indicate that the value of U.S. imports under categories actually labeled “hemp,” such as hemp seeds and fibers, which are more often used as inputs for use in further manufacturing, was nearly $11.5 million in 2011. Compared to available data for 2007, the value of imported hemp products for use as inputs and ingredients has more than doubled. However, import volumes for other products such as hemp oil and fabrics are lower (Table 1). Trade data are not available for finished products, such as hemp-based clothing or other products including construction materials, carpets, or hemp-based paper products.”

Source:
Johnson, Renée, “Hemp As An Agricultural Commodity,” Congressional Research Service (Washington, DC: Library of Congress, July 24, 2013), p. 6.
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL32725.pdf

6. (Cross Pollination of Drug-Crop Cannabis With Industrial Hemp During Cultivation“Hemp fields, in fact, could be a deterrent to marijuana growers. A strong case can be made that the best way to reduce the THC level of marijuana grown outdoors would be to grow industrial hemp near it. An experiment in Russia found that hemp pollen could travel 12 kilometers. This would mean that a hemp field would create a zone with a 12-kilometer radius within which no marijuana grower would want to establish a crop.
“The reciprocal also applies. Growers of hemp seed would not want Cannabis of an ‘off type’ (i.e., not the intended genetic type) mixing its pollen with their flowers. The isolation of genotypes is a common procedure used by the seed industry to preserve the genetic integrity of varieties. Valued strains are created by plant breeding, at substantial expense. Marijuana pollen would destroy this value.”

Source:
West, David P., PhD, “Hemp and Marijuana: Myths & Realities,” North American Industrial Hemp Council, 1998. Last accessed February 18, 2015.
http://www.naihc.org/hemp_information/content/hemp.mj.html


7. (Hemp Bast Fibres)
 “Hemp bast fibres are among the strongest and most durable of natural fibres, with high tensile strength, wet strength, and other characteristics favourable for various industrial products. It has been estimated that hemp produces three to four times as much useable fibre per acre per year as forests, and the bast fibre contains a low amount of lignin (the natural polymer that binds plant cells together), which allows it to be bleached without the use of chlorine. Hemp bast fibre is used in the production of a wide range of products where its strength and durability are advantageous, including cordage (rope, twine, etc.), specialty papers, fabrics for clothing and other applications, and industrial textiles such as geotextiles and carpeting. The strength of hemp fibre also makes it ideal for use in a range of composites for applications such as moulded car parts and fibreboard for construction.”

Source:
“National Industrial Hemp Strategy,” The Agricola Group (Ottawa, Canada: Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiative Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, March 30, 2008), p. 3.
http://www.votehemp.com/PDF/National_Industrial_Hemp_Strategy_Final_Comp…

8. (Production Differences Between Hemp and Marijuana) “Production differences depend on whether the cannabis plant is grown for fiber/oilseed or for medicinal/recreational uses. These differences involve the varieties being grown, the methods used to grow them, and the timing of their harvest (see discussion in ‘Hemp’ and ‘Marijuana,’ below). Concerns about cross-pollination among the different varieties are critical. All cannabis plants are open, wind and/or insect pollinated, and thus cross-pollination is possible.
“Because of the compositional differences between the drug and fiber varieties of cannabis, farmers growing either crop would necessarily want to separate production of the different varieties or cultivars. This is particularly true for growers of medicinal or recreational marijuana in an effort to avoid cross-pollination with industrial hemp, which would significantly lower the THC content and thus degrade the value of the marijuana crop. Likewise, growers of industrial hemp would seek to avoid cross-pollination with marijuana plants, especially given the illegal status of marijuana. Plants grown of oilseed are also marketed according to the purity of the product, and the mixing of off-type genotypes would degrade the value of the crop.8
“The different cannabis varieties are also harvested at different times (depending on the growing area), increasing the chance of detection of illegal marijuana, if production is commingled. Because of these differences, many claim that drug varieties of cannabis cannot easily be grown with oilseed or fiber varieties without being easily detected.9 As discussed below, among the visual plant differences are plant height (hemp is encouraged to grow tall, whereas marijuana is selected to grow short and tightly clustered); cultivation (hemp is grown as a single main stalk with few leaves and branches, whereas marijuana is encouraged to become bushy with many leaves and branches to promote flowers and buds); and planting density (hemp is densely planted to discourage branching and flowering, whereas marijuana plants are well-spaced).”

Source:
Johnson, Renée, “Hemp As An Agricultural Commodity,” Congressional Research Service (Washington, DC: Library of Congress, July 24, 2013), pp. 2-3.
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL32725.pdf

1cannabis29. (Hemp Hurds) “Hemp hurd is composed of cellulose-rich, short fibres, and make up approximately 75% of the hemp stalk. They are spongy and absorbent, ideal characteristics in applications such as animal bedding and industrial absorbents. They may also be used to produce low-quality paper. More recently, hemp hurd has been used to produce a concrete-like substance for use in building applications, as well as for insulation and to produce fibreboard.”

Source:
“National Industrial Hemp Strategy,” The Agricola Group (Ottawa, Canada: Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiative Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, March 30, 2008), p. 3.
http://www.votehemp.com/PDF/National_Industrial_Hemp_Strategy_Final_Comp…

10. (Hemp Stalks) “The whole hemp stalk can also be used to produce various biofuels such as bio-oil (or pyrolytic liquid), cellulosic ethanol, syngas (synthetic gas) and methane. Alternatively, the bast fibre can first be removed for use in high-value fibre applications, and the remaining hurd can then be processed into biofuel. The processes by which hemp is converted to biofuels may also produce valuable chemicals and other materials as bi-products.”

Source:
“National Industrial Hemp Strategy,” The Agricola Group (Ottawa, Canada: Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiative Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, March 30, 2008), p. 4.
http://www.votehemp.com/PDF/National_Industrial_Hemp_Strategy_Final_Comp…

oils.png11. (Hemp Oil) “Hemp oil is extremely nutritious, and is used in foods and nutraceutical products for humans and animals, as well as in personal care products. Hemp oil is also suitable for use in industrial products such as paints, varnishes, inks and industrial lubricants, and can be used to produce biodiesel. The crushed seed meal left over from oil production is frequently used for animal feed.”

Source:
“National Industrial Hemp Strategy,” The Agricola Group (Ottawa, Canada: Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiative Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, March 30, 2008), p. 4.
http://www.votehemp.com/PDF/National_Industrial_Hemp_Strategy_Final_Comp…

12. (Hemp vs. Marijuana) “Hemp is grown quite differently from marijuana. Moreover, it is harvested at a different time than marijuana. Finally, cross-pollination between hemp plants and marijuana plants would significantly reduce the potency of the marijuana plant.”

Source:
West, David P, Hemp and Marijuana: Myths and Realities (Madison, WI: North American Industrial Hemp Council, 1998), p. 4.
http://www.votehemp.com/PDF/myths_facts.pdf

farming.png13. (Hemp Cultivation in EU) “The survey covers the harvest of 2010, related to a total cultivation area of 10,480 ha and 14 Hemp processing companies, as well as two associations of Hemp processing companies. In the official EU statistics 10,617 ha are shown for the cultivation year 2010 – that would mean that the survey covers 98.7% of the EU cultivation area. The first figure shows the development of the cultivation area since 1993. Between 1993 and 1996 the cultivation of industrial Hemp was legalised in most of the member states, some followed later. In 2011 the cultivation area decreased to its lowest value since 1994 (ca. 8,000 ha), but increased in 2012 again to 14,000 ha. That means that the Hemp cultivation area in the EU over the last ten years was between 10,000 and 15,000 ha, except 2003 (18,000 ha) and 2011 (8,000 ha). The main cultivation member states are France, The UK and The Netherlands. Since 2011 Hemp cultivation in Germany has virtually ceased because the main processor moved to France due to strong land competition from highly supported bioenergy and biofuel crops in Germany.
“From the existing processing capacity the cultivation area could be extended to at least 20,000 ha without additional investment. This means that an increasing demand could easily be covered.”

Source:
Michael Carus, Stefan Karst, Alexandre Kauffmann, John Hobson and Sylvestre Bertucelli, “The European Hemp Industry: Cultivation, processing and applications for fibres, shivs and seeds” (Huerth, Germany: European Industrial Hemp Association, June 2013), pp. 1-2.
http://www.eiha.org/attach/855/13-06_European_Hemp_Industry.pdf

14. (Hemp and THC) According to David West, PhD, “The THC levels in industrial hemp are so low that no one could ever get high from smoking it. Moreover, hemp contains a relatively high percentage of another cannabinoid, CBD, that actually blocks the marijuana high. Hemp, it turns out, is not only not marijuana; it could be called ‘antimarijuana.’”

Source:
West, David P, Hemp and Marijuana: Myths and Realities (Madison, WI: North American Industrial Hemp Council, 1998), p. 3.
http://www.votehemp.com/PDF/myths_facts.pdf

15. (Possibility of Positive THC Test Through Exposure to Hemp Products) “Results of the hemp products tested indicate the amount of THC present in commercially available products is significantly less in products available today than those reported in the past (15-22). As a result, the probability that these products will produce urine THC metabolite levels greater than the DoD and HHS confirmation cutoff of 15 ng/mL is significantly reduced and should not be considered as a realistic cause for a positive urine analysis result.”

Source:
Holler, Justin M., Bosy, Thomas Z., et al., “Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Content of Commercially Available Hemp Products,” Journal of Analytical Toxicology, Vol. 32, July/August 2008, p. 431.
http://jat.oxfordjournals.org/content/32/6/428.full.pdf

16. (Hemp and Detection of THC Through Urinalysis) “Hemp seeds represent the manufacturing starting point for the vast majority of hemp products marketed since the mid-1990s. Hemp seeds are a good source of essential fatty acids, primarily alpha-linolenic acid (omega-3) and ]linoleic acid (omega-6). They are also found in fish, flaxseed, rapeseed oil, pumpkin seeds, and sunflower seeds. Essential fatty acids (EFA) are necessary fats that humans cannot synthesize, so they must be obtained through diet. EFAs support the cardiovascular, reproductive,immune, and nervous systems. The human body needs EFAs to manufacture and repair cell membranes, enabling the cells to obtain optimum nutrition and expel harmful waste products (9). THC found in manufactured products is present via contamination from resin produced in the leaves and buds that come into contact with the seed shell. Seed decontamination and manufacturing processes including wash steps and cold pressing for hemp products have improved since the mid-1990s, leading to the much lower THC concentrations currently found in today’s commercial products.
“The presence of THC in these products has been a source of concern for the military and other workplace drug-testing programs. Ingestion of hemp products has been historically used as a defense in military and civilian trials for many years and continues today despite decreased concentrations of THC in hemp products (10-12). The Division of Forensic Toxicology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology is often asked to analyze hemp products to determine their THC content in addition to rendering an opinion as to whether or not this THC concentration could be a reasonable cause for a positive THC metabolite urine analysis result.”

Source:
Holler, Justin M., Bosy, Thomas Z., et al., “Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Content of Commercially Available Hemp Products,” Journal of Analytical Toxicology, Vol. 32, July/August 2008, pp. 428-429.
http://jat.oxfordjournals.org/content/32/6/428.full.pdf

17. (Sources of Hemp Imported to the US) “The single largest supplier of U.S. imports of raw and processed hemp fiber is China. Other leading country suppliers include Romania, Hungary, India, and other European countries. The single largest source of U.S. imports of hemp seed and oilcake is Canada. The total value of Canada’s exports of hemp seed to the United States has grown significantly in recent years following resolution of a long-standing legal dispute over U.S. imports of hemp foods in late 2004 (see “Dispute over Hemp Food Imports (1999-2004)”). European countries such as the United Kingdom and Switzerland also have supplied hemp seed and oilcake to the United States.”

Source:
Johnson, Renée, “Hemp As An Agricultural Commodity,” Congressional Research Service (Washington, DC: Library of Congress, July 24, 2013), pp. 6-7.
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL32725.pdf

18. (Hemp Oil and Dermatitis) “Skin dryness and itchiness, in particular, are very serious problems in atopic dermatitis, which often lead to additional complications, such as opportunistic infections. In any event, it seems that the reduction of atopic symptomology observed in this study is a direct result of ingested hempseed oil. These preliminary results confirm anecdotal observations of improved skin quality after ingesting modest amounts of hempseed oil on a daily basis over a relatively short period of time.”

Source:
Callaway, James; Schwab, Ursula; Harvima, Ilkka; Halonen, Pirjo; Mykkanen, Otto; Hyvonen, Pekka; and Jarvinen, Tomi, “Efficacy of dietary hempseed oil in patients with atopic dermatitis,” Journal of Dermatological Treatment (London, United Kingdom: April 2005) Vol. 16, No. 2, p. 93.
http://www.finola.com/FinolaOilandAtopy.pdf

19. (Advantages of Hemp Versus Hydrocarbon-Based Products) “Comparisons of industrial hemp to hydrocarbon or other conventional industrial feedstocks show that, generally, hemp requires substantially less energy for manufacturing, often is suited to less-toxic means of processing, and provides competitive product performance (especially in terms of durability, light weight, and strength), greater recyclability and/or biodegradability, and a number of value-added applications for byproducts and waste materials at either end of the product life cycle.”

Source:
Smith-Heisters, Skaidra, “Illegally Green: Environmental Costs of Hemp Prohibition,” Reason Foundation (Los Angeles, CA: March 2008), p. 31.
http://reason.org/files/1030ae0323a3140ecf531bd473632b57.pdf

20. (Estimate of Hemp Market in the US in 2000) “No data are available on imports of hemp seed and oil into the United States, but data do exist on hemp fiber, yarn, and fabrics. Imports of raw hemp fiber have increased dramatically in the last few years, rising from less than 500 pounds in 1994 to over 1.5 million pounds for the first 9 months of 1999. Yarn imports also have risen substantially, peaking at slightly less than 625,000 pounds in 1997. The switch from yarn to raw fiber in the last 2 years probably reflects the development of U.S. spinning capacity. At least two companies are now spinning hemp yarn from imported fibers. Imports of hemp fabric have more than doubled from over 222,000 pounds in 1995 to about 523,000 pounds in 1998.
“Current markets for bast fibers like industrial hemp include specialty textiles, paper, and composites. Hemp hurds are used in various applications such as animal bedding, composites, and low-quality papers. As joint products, finding viable markets for both hemp bast fiber and hurds may increase the chances of a successful business venture.”

Source:
United States Department of Agriculture, “Industrial Hemp in the United States: Status and Market Potential” (Washington, DC: January 2000), p. iii.
http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/ages/ages001e.aspx

21. (Hemp and Nutrition) “The quality of an oil or fat is most importantly determined by its fatty acid composition. Hemp is of high nutritional quality because it contains high amounts of unsaturated fatty acids, mostly oleic acid (C18:1, 10%–16%), linoleic acid (C18:2, 50%–60%), alpha-linolenic acid (C18:3, 20%–25%), and gammalinolenic acid (C18:3, 2%–5%) (Fig. 37). Linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid are the only two fatty acids that must be ingested and are considered essential to human health (Callaway 1998). In contrast to shorter-chain and more saturated fatty acids, these essential fatty acids do not serve as energy sources, but as raw materials for cell structure and as precursors for biosynthesis for many of the body’s regulatory biochemicals.”

Source:
Small, Ernest and Marcus, David , “Hemp: A New Crop with New Uses for North America,” Trends in New Crops and New Uses (West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Center for New Crops and Plant Products, 2002), p. 306.
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/ncnu02/pdf/small.pdf

22. (Estimated Potential US Retail Hemp Market) “Retail sales of imported hemp products exceeded $70 million in the United States in 2006.62 Given hemp’s wide-ranging utility, supporters of domestic cultivation estimate that it would create a $300 million dollar industry.63”

Source:
Kolosov, Christine A., “Evaluating the Public Interest: Regulation of Industrial Hemp under the Controlled Substances Act,” UCLA Law Review (Los Angeles, CA: UCLA School of Law, 2009), p. 244.
http://uclalawreview.org/pdf/57-1-5.pdf

23. (Potential Economic Benefits, Kentucky 1998) In a July 1998 study issued by the Center for Business and Economic Research at the University of Kentucky, researchers estimated that if Kentucky again became the main source for industrial hemp seed (as it was in the past), the state could earn the following economic benefits:

Scenario Full time jobs created Worker Earnings Main source for certified industrial seeds only 69 jobs$1,300,000.00Certified seeds, plus one processing facility 303 jobs$6,700,000.00Certified seeds, plus two processing facilities 537 jobs$12,100,000.00Certified seeds, one processing facility, one industrial hemp paper-pulp plant 771 jobs $17,600,000.00
Source:
Tompson, Eric C., PhD, Berger, Mark C., PhD, and Allen, Steven N., Economic Impacts of Industrial Hemp in Kentucky (Lexington, KY: University of Kentucky, Center for Business and Economic Research, 1998), p. iv.
http://www.votehemp.com/PDF/hempstudy.pdf

24. (Potential Economic Benefits, Kentucky 1998) In a July 1998 study issued by the Center for Business and Economic Research at the University of Kentucky, researchers concluded that Kentucky hemp farmers could earn a net profit of $600 per acre for raising certified seeds, $320 net profit per acre for straw only or straw and grain production, and $220 net profit per acre for grain only production. The only crop found to be more profitable was tobacco.

Source:
Tompson, Eric C., PhD, Berger, Mark C., PhD, and Allen, Steven N., Economic Impacts of Industrial Hemp in Kentucky (Lexington, KY: University of Kentucky, Center for Business and Economic Research, 1998), p. 21.
http://www.votehemp.com/PDF/hempstudy.pdf

Laws and Policies

25. (Federal Law and DEA Control Over Hemp Production in the US) “In 1937, Congress passed the first federal law to discourage Cannabis production for marijuana while still permitting industrial uses of the crop (the Marihuana Tax Act; 50 Stat. 551). Under this statute, the government actively encouraged farmers to grow hemp for fiber and oil during World War II. After the war, competition from synthetic fibers, the Marihuana Tax Act, and increasing public anti-drug sentiment resulted in fewer and fewer acres of hemp being planted, and none at all after 1958.
“Strictly speaking, the Controlled Substances Act of 1970 (CSA, 21 U.S.C. §801 et. seq.) does not make growing hemp illegal; rather, it places strict controls on the production of hemp, making it illegal to grow the crop without a DEA permit.
“The CSA adopted the same definition of Cannabis sativa that appeared in the 1937 Marihuana Tax Act. The definition of “marihuana” (21 U.S.C. §802(16) reads:

The term marihuana means all parts of the plant Cannabis sativa L., whether growing or not; the
seeds thereof; the resin extracted from any part of such plant; and every compound, manufacture,
salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such plant, its seeds or resin. Such term does not
include the mature stalks of such plant, fiber produced from such stalks, oil or cake made from
the seeds of such plant, any other compound … or preparation of such mature stalks (except the
resin extracted therefrom), fiber, oil, or cake, or the sterilized seed of such plant which is
incapable of germination.

“The statute thus retains control over all varieties of the cannabis plant by virtue of including them under the term ‘marijuana’ and does not distinguish between low- and high-THC varieties. The language exempts from control the parts of mature plants—stalks, fiber, oil, cake, etc. — intended for industrial uses. Some have argued that the CSA definition exempts industrial hemp under its term exclusions for stalks, fiber, oil and cake, and seeds.52 DEA refutes this interpretation.53
“Since federal law prohibits cultivation without a permit, DEA determines whether any industrial hemp production authorized under a state statute is permitted, and it enforces standards governing the security conditions under which the crop must be grown. In other words, a grower needs to get permission from the DEA to grow hemp or faces the possibility of federal charges or property confiscation, regardless of whether the grower has a state-issued permit.54

Source:
Johnson, Renée, “Hemp As An Agricultural Commodity,” Congressional Research Service (Washington, DC: Library of Congress, July 24, 2013), p. 13.
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL32725.pdf

26. (Hemp Products and the DEA) In late 1999, during the development of the 2003 rules (described in the previous section), the DEA acted administratively to demand that the U.S. Customs Service enforce a zero-tolerance standard for the THC content of all forms of imported hemp, and hemp foods in particular.
“The DEA followed up, in October 2001, with publication of an interpretive rule in the Federal Register explaining the basis of its zero-tolerance standard.63 It held that when Congress wrote the statutory definition of marijuana in 1937, it ‘exempted certain portions of the Cannabis plant from the definition of marijuana based on the assumption (now refuted) that such portions of the plant contain none of the psychoactive component now known as THC.’ Both the proposed rule (which was published concurrently with the interpretive rule) and the final 2003 rule gave retailers of hemp foods a date after which the DEA could seize all such products remaining on shelves. On both rules, hemp trade associations requested and received court-ordered stays blocking enforcement of that provision. The DEA’s interpretation made hemp with any THC content subject to enforcement as a controlled substance.
“Hemp industry trade groups, retailers, and a major Canadian exporter filed suit against the DEA, arguing that congressional intent was to exempt plant parts containing naturally occurring THC at non-psychoactive levels, the same way it exempts poppy seeds containing trace amounts of naturally occurring opiates.64Industry groups maintain that (1) naturally occurring THC in the leaves and flowers of cannabis varieties grown for fiber and food is already at below-psychoactive levels (compared with drug varieties); (2) the parts used for food purposes (seeds and oil) contain even less; and (3) after processing, the THC content is at or close to zero. U.S. and Canadian hemp seed and food manufacturers have in place a voluntary program for certifying low, industry-determined standards in hemp-containing foods. Background information on the TestPledge Program is available athttp://www.TestPledge.com. The intent of the program is to assure that consumption of hemp foods will not interfere with workplace drug testing programs or produce undesirable mental or physical health effects.
“On February 6, 2004, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit permanently enjoined the enforcement of the final rule.65 The court stated that ‘the DEA’s definition of ‘THC’ contravenes the unambiguously expressed intent of Congress in the CSA and cannot be upheld.’66 In late September 2004 the Bush Administration let the final deadline pass without filing an appeal.”

Source:
Johnson, Renée, “Hemp As An Agricultural Commodity,” Congressional Research Service (Washington, DC: Library of Congress, July 24, 2013), p. 15.
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL32725.pdf

27. (State Laws Regarding Hemp) “Beginning around 1995, an increasing number of state legislatures began to consider a variety of initiatives related to industrial hemp. Most of these have been resolutions calling for scientific, economic, or environmental studies, and some are laws authorizing planting experimental plots under state statutes. Nonetheless, the actual planting of hemp, even for state-authorized experimental purposes, remains regulated by the DEA under the Controlled Substances Act.
“A summary of current state legislative actions regarding industrial hemp, according to the advocacy organization Vote Hemp, is as follows (also see text box):79
“• Nine states have defined industrial hemp as distinct and removed barriers to its production (Colorado, Kentucky, Maine, Montana, North Dakota, Oregon, Vermont, Washington, and West Virginia).
“• Three states have passed bills creating commissions or authorizing research (Hawaii, Kentucky, and Maryland).
“• Nine states have passed hemp resolutions (California, Colorado, Illinois, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Dakota, Vermont, and Virginia).
“• Eight states have passed hemp study bills (Arkansas, Illinois, Maine, Minnesota, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, and Vermont). (Some states have done studies without legislative directive.)
“Although several states have established programs under which a farmer may be able to grow industrial hemp under certain circumstances, a grower would still need to obtain a DEA permit and abide by the DEA’s strict production controls. This relationship has resulted in some high-profile cases, wherein growers have applied for a permit but DEA has not approved (or denied) a permit to grow hemp, even in states that authorize cultivation under state laws. Ongoing cases involve attempts to grow hemp under state law in North Dakota, Montana, Vermont, and other states. DEA permits to grow hemp have been issued to some university researchers and to the Hawaii Industrial Hemp Research Program.80
“Changes to Colorado’s state laws in November 2012 now allow for industrial hemp cultivation in small test plots, and industrial hemp is now reported as being grown in Colorado.81 Changes to Kentucky’s state laws in April 2013 might also soon allow for hemp to be grown in that state.”

Source:
Johnson, Renée, “Hemp As An Agricultural Commodity,” Congressional Research Service (Washington, DC: Library of Congress, July 24, 2013), p. 18.
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL32725.pdf

28. (Controlled Substances Act) “The CSA [Controlled Substances Act] classifies marijuana in the first category of schedules, placing it among the most harmful and dangerous drugs.137 Marijuana meets the criteria for a Schedule I controlled substance because of its THC content, which is a psychoactive hallucinogenic substance with a high potential for abuse.138 Another key classification made by the CSA regarding marijuana was its broad definition of the drug.139 The CSA defines marijuana as follows:
“The term ‘“marihuana” means all parts of the plant Cannabis sativa L., whether growing or not; the seeds thereof; the resin extracted from any part of such plant; and every compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such plant, its seeds or resin. Such term does not include the mature stalks of such plant, fiber produced from such stalks, oil or cake made from the seeds of such plant, any other compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such mature stalks (except the resin extracted therefrom), fiber, oil, or cake, or the sterilized seed of such plant which is incapable of germination.140
“This effectively placed the entire use of the hemp plant, whether for drug use or as industrial hemp, squarely under the control of the CSA.141 Therefore, the DEA views industrial hemp containing .3% THC the same as marijuana grown for drug use which commonly contains a 24% THC level, or eighty times more THC.142”

Source:
Duppong, Thomas A., “Industrial Hemp: How the Classification of Industrial Hemp as Marijuana under the Controlled Substances Act Has Caused the Dream of Growing Industrial Hemp in North Dakota to Go up in Smoke,” North Dakota Law Review (Grand Forks, ND: University of North Dakota School of Law, 2009) Vol. 85, No. 2, p. 417-418.
http://web.law.und.edu/LawReview/issues/web_assets/pdf/85-2/85NDLR403.pd…

29. “Legislative history suggests that Congress accepted the name Cannabis sativa L. for the hemp plant, believing it to be the common description within the scientific community.41 This categorization combined all marijuana-producing Cannabis plants.42 Therefore, any hemp plant capable of producing any amount of THC was classified as Cannabis sativa L. under the CSA.43”

Source:
Duppong, Thomas A., “Industrial Hemp: How the Classification of Industrial Hemp as Marijuana under the Controlled Substances Act Has Caused the Dream of Growing Industrial Hemp in North Dakota to Go up in Smoke,” North Dakota Law Review (Grand Forks, ND: University of North Dakota School of Law, 2009) Vol. 85, No. 2, p. 407.
http://web.law.und.edu/LawReview/issues/web_assets/pdf/85-2/85NDLR403.pd…

30. (Countries Which Grow Hemp) “Approximately 30 countries in Europe, Asia, and North and South America currently permit farmers to grow hemp. Some of these countries never outlawed production, while some countries banned production for certain periods in the past. China is among the largest producing and exporting countries of hemp textiles and related products, as well as a major supplier of these products to the United States. The European Union (EU) has an active hemp market, with production in most member nations. Production is centered in France, the United Kingdom, Romania, and Hungary.36
“Acreage in hemp cultivation worldwide has been mostly flat to decreasing, reported at about 200,000 acres globally in 2011.37 Although variable year-to-year, global production has increased overall from about 250 million pounds in 1999 to more than 380 million pounds in 2011, mostly due to increasing production of hemp seed (Figure 2). Upward trends in global hemp seed production roughly track similar upward trends in U.S. imports of hemp seed and oil, mostly for use in hemp-based foods, supplements, and body care products (Table 1).
“Many EU countries lifted their bans on hemp production in the 1990s and, until recently, also subsidized the production of “flax and hemp” under the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy.38 EU hemp acreage was reported at about 26,000 acres in 2010, which was below previous years, when more than 50,000 acres of hemp were under production.39 Most EU production is of hurds, seeds, and fibers. Other non-EU European countries with reported hemp production include Russia, Ukraine, and Switzerland. Other countries with active hemp grower and/or consumer markets are Australia, New Zealand, India, Japan, Korea, Turkey, Egypt, Chile, and Thailand.40”

Source:
Johnson, Renée, “Hemp As An Agricultural Commodity,” Congressional Research Service (Washington, DC: Library of Congress, July 24, 2013), pp. 9-10.
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL32725.pdf

31. (Hemp and CBD) “Another chemical shared by both industrial hemp and marijuana is Cannabidiol (CBD).48 CBD is unique because it is not intoxicating and it also moderates the euphoric effect of THC.49 Marijuana, which has disproportionately higher levels of THC than industrial hemp, also contains lower levels of CBD.50 The higher THC and lower CBD concentration gives marijuana its psychoactive effect.51 Conversely, industrial hemp’s low THC levels and comparatively high CBD levels produce none of the intoxicating effects of marijuana.52”

Source:
Duppong, Thomas A., “Industrial Hemp: How the Classification of Industrial Hemp as Marijuana under the Controlled Substances Act Has Caused the Dream of Growing Industrial Hemp in North Dakota to Go up in Smoke,” North Dakota Law Review (Grand Forks, ND: University of North Dakota School of Law, 2009) Vol. 85, No. 2, p. 408.
http://web.law.und.edu/LawReview/issues/web_assets/pdf/85-2/85NDLR403.pd…

32. (Hemp History) “From the colonial period through the middle of the nineteenth century, hemp was widely grown in the United States for use in fabric, twine, and paper.19 Production dropped by the 1890’s as technological advances made cotton a more competitive textile crop, and coarse fiber crops were increasingly imported. Nonetheless, American farmers continued to grow hemp into the middle of the twentieth century, finding it a useful rotation crop because it acted as a natural herbicide—a dense, rapidly growing crop, it choked out weeds prior to the next planting of corn and other crops.22 At the urging of the government, production to supply fiber for military purposes was expanded enormously during World War I and again during World War II, particularly after the Japanese cut off exports from the Philippines.”

Source:
Kolosov, Christine A., “Evaluating the Public Interest: Regulation of Industrial Hemp under the Controlled Substances Act,” UCLA Law Review (Los Angeles, CA: UCLA School of Law, 2009), p. 241.
http://uclalawreview.org/pdf/57-1-5.pdf

33. (Hemp History) “Probably indigenous to temperate Asia, C. sativa is the most widely cited example of a “camp follower.” It was pre-adapted to thrive in the manured soils around man’s early settlements, which quickly led to its domestication (Schultes 1970). Hemp was harvested by the Chinese 8500 years ago (Schultes and Hofmann 1980). For most of its history, C. sativa was most valued as a fiber source, considerably less so as an intoxicant, and only to a limited extent as an oilseed crop. Hemp is one of the oldest sources of textile fiber, with extant remains of hempen cloth trailing back 6 millennia. Hemp grown for fiber was introduced to western Asia and Egypt, and subsequently to Europe somewhere between 1000 and 2000 BCE. Cultivation in Europe became widespread after 500 CE. The crop was first brought to South America in 1545, in Chile, and to North America in Port Royal, Acadia in 1606. The hemp industry flourished in Kentucky, Missouri, and Illinois between 1840 and 1860 because of the strong demand for sailcloth and cordage (Ehrensing 1998). From the end of the Civil War until 1912, virtually all hemp in the US was produced in Kentucky.”

Source:
Small, Ernest and Marcus, David , “Hemp: A New Crop with New Uses for North America,” Trends in New Crops and New Uses (West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Center for New Crops and Plant Products, 2002), p. 284.
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/ncnu02/pdf/small.pdf

34. (History in American History) “Hemp was widely grown in the United States from the colonial period into the mid-1800s; fine and coarse fabrics, twine, and paper from hemp were in common use. By the 1890s, labor-saving machinery for harvesting cotton made the latter more competitive as a source of fabric for clothing, and the demand for coarse natural fibers was met increasingly by imports. Industrial hemp was handled in the same way as any other farm commodity, in that USDA compiled statistics and published crop reports,45 and provided assistance to farmers promoting production and distribution.46 In the early 1900s, hemp continued to be grown and researchers at USDA continued to publish information related to hemp production and also reported on hemp’s potential for use in textiles and in paper manufacturing.47 Several hemp advocacy groups, including the Hemp Industries Association (HIA) and Vote Hemp Inc., have compiled other historical information and have copies of original source documents.48
“Between 1914 and 1933, in an effort to stem the use of Cannabis flowers and leaves for their psychotropic effects, 33 states passed laws restricting legal production to medicinal and industrial purposes only.49 The 1937 Marihuana Tax Act defined hemp as a narcotic drug, requiring that farmers growing hemp hold a federal registration and special tax stamp, effectively limiting further production expansion.
“Hemp was briefly brought back into large-scale production during World War II, at the urging of USDA, to provide for ‘products spun from American-grown hemp’ including ‘twine of various kinds for tying and upholsters work; rope for marine rigging and towing; for hay forks, derricks, and heavy duty tackle; light duty fire hose; thread for shoes for millions of American soldiers; and parachute webbing for our paratroopers,’ as well as ‘hemp for mooring ships; hemp for tow lines; hemp for tackle and gear; hemp for countless naval uses both on ship and shore.’50
“In 1943, U.S. hemp production reached more than 150 million pounds (140.7 million pounds hemp fiber; 10.7 million pound hemp seed) on 146,200 harvested acres. This compared to pre-war production levels of about 1 million pounds. After reaching a peak in 1943, production started to decline. By 1948, production had dropped back to 3 million pounds on 2,800 harvested acres, with no recorded production after the late 1950s.51”

Source:
Johnson, Renée, “Hemp As An Agricultural Commodity,” Congressional Research Service (Washington, DC: Library of Congress, July 24, 2013), p. 12.
http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RL32725.pdf

35. (Hemp in US History) “During World War I, some hemp cultivation occurred in several states, including Kentucky, Wisconsin, California, North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, Michigan, Kansas, and Iowa (Ehrensing 1998). The second world war led to a brief revival of hemp cultivation in the Midwest, as well as in Canada, because the war cut off supplies of fiber (substantial renewed cultivation also occurred in Germany for the same reason). Until the beginning of the 19th century, hemp was the leading cordage fiber. Until the middle of the 19th century, hemp rivaled flax as the chief textile fiber of vegetable origin, and indeed was described as ‘the king of fiber-bearing plants,—the standard by which all other fibers are measured’ (Boyce 1900). Nevertheless, the Marihuana Tax Act applied in 1938 essentially ended hemp production in the United States, although a small hemp fiber industry continued in Wisconsin until 1958. Similarly in 1938 the cultivation of Cannabis became illegal in Canada under the Opium and Narcotics Act.”

Source:
Small, Ernest and Marcus, David , “Hemp: A New Crop with New Uses for North America,” Trends in New Crops and New Uses (West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University Center for New Crops and Plant Products, 2002), p. 284.
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/ncnu02/pdf/small.pdf

– See more at: http://www.drugwarfacts.org/cms/hemp#sthash.uAdTb7gg.hUz8u9dD.dpuf

700-MEDICINAL-USES-OF-CANNABIS

http://www.encod.org/info/700-MEDICINAL-USES-OF-CANNABIS.html

700 MEDICINAL USES OF CANNABIS SORTED BY DISEASE

Source: Weedbay

A collection of clinical studies, papers and reference providing the ultimate resource for medical disorders helped by medical marijuana.

If a link doesn’t work , try Weedbay

All the versions of this article: [English]

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884

ADD/ ADHD

Marijuana and ADD Therapeutic uses of Medical Marijuana in the treatment of ADD
http://www.onlinepot.org/medical/add&mmj.htm

Cannabis as a medical treatment for attention deficit disorder –
http://www.chanvre-info.ch/info/en/…-treatment.html

Cannabinoids effective in animal model of hyperactivity disorder
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english/bulletin/ww_en_db_cannabis_artikel.php?id=162#4

Cannabis ’Scrips to Calm Kids?
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,117541,00.html

Addiction risk- Physical

Women’s Guide to the UofC
http://wguide.uchicago.edu/9substance.html

Cannabis Basics
http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannabis/cannabis_basics.shtml

10 Things Every Parent, Teenager & Teacher Should Know About Marijuana (4th Q)
http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannabis/cannabis_flyer1.shtml

Marijuana Myths, Claim No. 9
http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannabis/cannabis_myth9.shtml

AIDS – see HIV

Alcoholism

Role of cannabinoid receptors in alcohol abuse
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/30338.php

Cannabidiol, Antioxidants, and Diuretics in Reversing Binge Ethanol-Induced Neurotoxicity
http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/content/314/2/780.abstract?maxtoshow=&HITS=&hits=&RESULTFORMAT=&fulltext=cannabidiol%252Bantioxidants%252Bdiuretics%252Bneurotoxicity&andorexactfulltext=and&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&resource

Cannabis substitution
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies/ww_en_db_study_show.php?s_id=86

Cannabis as a Substitute for Alcohol
http://ccrmg.org/journal/03sum/substitutealcohol.html

ALS

Cannabinol delays symptom onset
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…t_uids=16183560

Marijuana in the management of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/11467101

Cannabis use in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/15055508

Cannabis Relieves Lou Gehrigs Symptoms
http://www.rense.com/general51/lou.htm

Cannabis’ Potential Exciting Researchers in Treatment of ALS, Parkinson’s Disease
http://66.218.69.11/search/cache?ei…&icp=1&.intl=us

Alzheimers

MARIJUANA SLOWS ALZHEIMER’S DECLINE
http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v05/n307/a10.html

Marijuana may block Alzheimer’s
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4286435.stm

Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology by Cannabinoids
http://www.jneurosci.org/cgi/content/abstract/25/8/1904

Marijuana’s Active Ingredient Shown to Inhibit Primary Marker of Alzheimer’s Disease
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/articles/ca060809.htm

Dronabinol in the treatment of agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease with anorexia
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies/ww_en_db_study_show.php?s_id=61

Dronabinol in the treatment of refractory agitation in Alzheimer’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies/ww_en_db_study_show.php?s_id=92

Effects of dronabinol on anorexia and disturbed behavior in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies/ww_en_db_study_show.php?s_id=59

Cannabinoids reduce the progression of Alzheimer’s disease in animals
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english/bulletin/ww_en_db_cannabis_artikel.php?id=187#1

Molecular Link between the Active Component of Marijuana and Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…sease_Pathology

THC inhibits primary marker of Alzheimer’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english/bulletin/ww_en_db_cannabis_artikel.php?id=225#3

Amotivational Syndrome

Amotivational Syndrome
http://leda.lycaeum.org/?ID=12454

Marijuana Myths, Claim No. 11
http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannab…is_myth11.shtml

Debunking ’Amotivational Syndrome’
http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v06/n400/a06.html

Amotivational Syndrome
http://www.bookrags.com/Amotivational_syndrome

Debunking the Amotivational Syndrome
http://www.drugscience.org/Petition/C3F.html

Cannabis Use Not Linked To So-Called “Amotivational Syndrome”
http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Grou…tm_format=print

Anecdotal Evidence/First person stories
Shared Comments and Observations
http://www.rxmarihuana.com/comments…bservations.htm

Cannabis Sativa (Marijuana) for Fibromyalgia
http://www.fibromyalgia-reviews.com/Drg_Marijuana.cfm

ANECDOTAL ARTICLES
http://cannabislink.ca/medical/#medanecdotal

Testimonials
http://www.benefitsofmarijuana.com/testimonials.html

Excerpts of testimonials.
http://www.ganjaland.com/freemedicalseeds.htm

Appetite Stimulant

Dronabinol an effective appetite stimulant?
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies/ww_en_db_study_show.php?s_id=188

THC improves appetite and reverses weight loss in AIDS patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=189

Efficacy of dronabinol alone and in combination
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=191

Dronabinol and marijuana in HIV-positive marijuana smokers: caloric intake, mood, and sleep.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=190

The synthetic cannabinoid nabilone improves pain and symptom management in cancer patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=177

Dronabinol for supportive therapy in patients with malignant melanoma and liver metastases
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=180

Safety and efficacy of dronabinol in the treatment of agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=61

The perceived effects of smoked cannabis on patients with multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=13

Effects of dronabinol on anorexia and disturbed behavior in patients with Alzheimer’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=59

Dronabinol as a treatment for anorexia associated with weight loss in patients with AIDS.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=21

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol for appetite stimulation in cancer-associated anorexia
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=52

Effect of dronabinol on nutritional status in HIV infection.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=150

Dronabinol stimulates appetite and causes weight gain in HIV patients.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=20

Dronabinol effects on weight in patients with HIV infection.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=45

Recent clinical experience with dronabinol.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=90

Dronabinol enhancement of appetite in cancer patients.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=149

Effects of smoked marijuana on food intake and body weight
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=117

Behavioral analysis of marijuana effects on food intake in humans.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=118

Cancer-related anorexia-cachexia syndrome
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…xia_Study_Group

THC effective in appetite and weight loss in severe lung disease (COPD)
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=191#2

Machinery Of The ’Marijuana Munchies’
http://www.sciencedaily.com/release…51226102503.htm

Arthritis

Cannabidiol is an oral anti-arthritic therapeutic in murine collagen-induced arthritis
http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/97/17/9561

The Cannabinergic System as a Target for Anti-inflammatory Therapies
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/conte…000013/art00008

Sativex in the treatment of pain caused by rheumatoid arthritis
http://rheumatology.oxfordjournals….bstract/45/1/50

Suppression of fibroblast metalloproteinases by ajulemic acid,
http://ccicnewsletter.com/index.php…06_Rheumatology

The antinociceptive effect of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in the arthritic rat
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…binoid_receptor

Synergy between Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and morphine in the arthritic rat
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…e_arthritic_rat

Cannabis based medicine eases pain and suppresses disease
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/33376.php

Pot-Based Drug Promising for Arthritis
http://www.webmd.com/rheumatoid-art…g-for-arthritis

Asthma

The Cannabinergic System as a Target for Anti-inflammatory Therapies
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/conte…000013/art00008

Acute and subacute bronchial effects of oral cannabinoids.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=44

Comparison of bronchial effects of nabilone and terbutaline
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=43

Bronchial effects of aerosolized delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=109

Bronchodilator effect of delta1-tetrahydrocannabinol administered by aerosol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=60

Effects of smoked marijuana in experimentally induced asthma.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=57

Marijuana and oral delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol on specific airway conductance
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=67

New Synthetic Delta-9-THC Inhaler Offers Safe, Rapid Delivery
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/22937.php

Smoked marijuana and oral delta-9-THC on specific airway conductance in asthmatic subjects
http://www.ukcia.org/research/Smoke…InAsthmatic.php

Atherosclerosis

Marijuana Chemical Fights Hardened Arteries
http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/…rdened-arteries

Does Cannabis Hold the Key to Treating Cardiometabolic Disease
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/525040_print

Cannabis may keep arteries clear
http://www.gnn.tv/headlines/2634/Ca…_arteries_clear

The Cannabinergic System as a Target for Anti-inflammatory Therapies
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/conte…000013/art00008

Cannabis compound tackles blood vessel disease
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/22658.php

Medical marijuana: study shows that THC slows atherosclerosis
http://thenexthurrah.typepad.com/th…al_marijua.html

Cardiovascular Effects of Cannabis
http://www.idmu.co.uk/canncardio.htm

Atrophie Blanche

Atrophie Blanche Treated With Cannabis and/or THC
http://ccrmg.org/journal/04spr/clinical.html#thm

Autism

Autism and Medical Marijuana

THE SAM PROJECT: James D.
http://www.letfreedomgrow.com/articles/james_d.htm

Medical marijuana: a valuable treatment for autism?
http://www.autismwebsite.com/ari/ne…r/marijuana.htm

Cancer – breast

Anandamide inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation
http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/95/14/8375

Inhibition of Human Breast and Prostate Cancer Cell Proliferation1
http://endo.endojournals.org/cgi/co…tract/141/1/118

Antitumor Activity of Plant Cannabinoids
http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/cgi/c…ract/318/3/1375

9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Inhibits Cell Cycle Progression in Human Breast Cancer
http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/c…ract/66/13/6615

Cannabidiol inhibits tumour growth in leukaemia and breast cancer
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=220#2

THC and prochlorperazine effective in reducing vomiting in women following breast surgery
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=219#1

Cancer- colorectal

Anandamide, induces cell death in colorectal carcinoma cells
http://gut.bmj.com/cgi/content/abstract/54/12/1741

Cannabinoids and cancer: potential for colorectal cancer therapy.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/16042581

Cancer- glioma/ brain

Anti-tumor effects of cannabidiol
http://www.hempworld.com/HempPharm/…milanstudy.html

Pot’s cancer healing properties
http://www.november.org/stayinfo/br…ncerKiller.html

Cannabinoids Inhibit the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Pathway in Gliomas
http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/c…hort/64/16/5617

Inhibition of Glioma Growth in Vivo
http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/c…/61/15/5784.pdf

Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=193

Cannabidiol triggers caspase activation and oxidative stress in human glioma cells.
http://www.ihop-net.org/UniPub/iHOP…l?pmid=16909207

Cannabinoid receptors in human astroglial tumors
http://www.brainlife.org/abstracts/…t_j20060800.pdf

Cannabis extract makes brain tumors shrink, halts growth of blood vessels
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/12088.php

THC tested against brain tumour in pilot clinical study
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=222#1

Cancer- leukemia

Cannabis-induced cytotoxicity in leukemic cell lines
http://bloodjournal.hematologylibra…ract/105/3/1214

Cannabidiol-Induced Apoptosis in Human Leukemia Cells
http://molpharm.aspetjournals.org/c…stract/70/3/897

Marijuana’s Active Ingredient Kills Leukemia Cells
http://www.treatingyourself.com/vbu…read.php?t=7107

Targeting CB2 cannabinoid receptors to treat malignant lymphoblastic disease
http://bloodjournal.hematologylibra…t/100/2/627.pdf

Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells
http://www.osti.gov/energycitations…osti_id=5164483

Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-Induced Apoptosis in Jurkat Leukemia T Cells
http://mcr.aacrjournals.org/cgi/con…bstract/4/8/549

Cannabidiol inhibits tumour growth in leukaemia and breast cancer
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=220#2

Cancer- lung

Antineoplastic activity of cannabinoids
http://www.ukcia.org/research/Antin…ds/default.html

Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol inhibits epithelial growth factor-induced lung cancer cell migration
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…astasis_in_vivo

Smoking Cannabis Does Not Cause Cancer Of Lung or Upper Airways
http://ccrmg.org/journal/05aut/nocancer.html

No association between lung cancer and cannabis smoking in large study
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=219#2

Marijuana Smoking Found Non-Carcinogenic
http://www.medpagetoday.com/Hematol…gCancer/tb/3393

CLAIM #4: MARIJUANA CAUSES LUNG DISEASE
http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannab…bis_myth4.shtml

Cancer- melanoma

Dronabinol for supportive therapy in patients with malignant melanoma and liver metastases.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=180

Intractable nausea and vomiting due to gastrointestinal mucosal metastases
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=35

Cancer – oral

Smoking of cannabis does not increase risk for oral cancer
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=175#1

Marijuana use and Risk of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma
http://66.218.69.11/search/cache?ei…&icp=1&.intl=us

Cancer-pancreatic

Cannabinoids Induce Apoptosis of Pancreatic Tumor Cells
http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/c…ract/66/13/6748

Cancer – prostate

Inhibition of Human Breast and Prostate Cancer Cell Proliferation
http://endo.endojournals.org/cgi/co…tract/141/1/118

Cannabinoid Receptor as a Novel Target for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer
http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/c…t/65/5/1635.pdf

Cancer – Risk Cannabis vs Tobacco

Cannabis Smoke and Cancer: Assessing the Risk
http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=6891

Cannabis and tobacco smoke are not equally carcinogenic
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/ar…i?artid=1277837

Smoking Marijuana Does Not Cause Lung Cancer
http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v05/n1065/a03.html

Blunt Smokers Link Dependence Potential To Nicotine
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/52838.php

Premiere British Medical Journal Pronounces Marijuana Safer Than Alcohol, Tobacco
http://cannabislink.ca/medical/safer.html

Why Doesn’t Smoking Marijuana Cause Cancer?
http://www.healthcentral.com/drdean/408/14275.html

Marijuana Smoking Found Non-Carcinogenic
http://www.medpagetoday.com/Hematol…gCancer/tb/3393


Cancer – Skin

Inhibition of skin tumor growth
http://www.jci.org/cgi/content/full…y=MpUgjDbqHybAU

Cannabis Reduces Skin Cancer
http://www.onlinepot.org/medical/skincancerreport.htm

Cancer – Testicular

The antiemetic efficacy of nabilone
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=127

Chemotherapy for Testicular Cancer
http://www.rxmarihuana.com/shared_c…icularchemo.htm

Cancer –various/ unnamed
Derivatives of cannabis for anti-cancer treatment
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_relea…uo-do060605.php

Cancer Killer
http://www.november.org/stayinfo/br…ncerKiller.html

Anandamide Induces Apoptosis
http://www.jbc.org/cgi/content/abstract/275/41/31938

Nabilone improves pain and symptom management
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=177

The effects of smoked cannabis in painful peripheral neuropathy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=96

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol for appetite stimulation
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=52

Dronabinol and prochlorperazine in combination
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=28

Dronabinol enhancement of appetite in cancer patients.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=149

Efficacy of tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=31

Inhalation marijuana as an antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=155

Nabilone versus domperidone
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=129

Inhalation marijuana as an antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=155

Nabilone vs. placebo in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=156

The antiemetic activity of tetrahydrocanabinol versus metoclopramide
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=24

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol as an antiemetic for patients receiving cancer chemotherapy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=5

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol as an antiemetic in cancer patients receiving high-dose methotrexate
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=23

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) as an antiemetic in patients treated with cancer chemotherapy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=27

Amelioration of cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting by delta-9-THC
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=107

Superiority of nabilone over prochlorperazine as an antiemetic
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=126

Analgesic effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=16

The analgesic properties of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and codeine.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=17

Comparison of orally administered cannabis extract and delta-9-THC
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…xia_Study_Group

Cannabis May Help Combat Cancer-causing Herpes Viruses
http://www.sciencedaily.com/release…40923092627.htm

Marijuana Smoking Found Non-Carcinogenic
http://www.medpagetoday.com/Hematol…gCancer/tb/3393

Cannabidiol

Cannabidiol, Antioxidants, and Diuretics in Reversing Binge Ethanol-Induced Neurotoxicity
http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/cgi/c…ource

Cannabinol delays symptom onset
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…t_uids=16183560

Cannabidiol is an oral anti-arthritic therapeutic in murine collagen-induced arthritis
http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/97/17/9561

Cannabidiol inhibits tumour growth in leukaemia and breast cancer
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=220#2

Anti-tumor effects of cannabidiol
http://www.hempworld.com/HempPharm/…milanstudy.html

Cannabidiol triggers caspase activation and oxidative stress in human glioma cells.
http://www.ihop-net.org/UniPub/iHOP…l?pmid=16909207

Cannabidiol-Induced Apoptosis in Human Leukemia Cells
http://molpharm.aspetjournals.org/c…stract/70/3/897

Cannabidiol inhibits tumour growth in leukaemia and breast cancer
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=220#2

Cannabidiol lowers incidence of diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/conte…sn7o5efqr.alice

Neuroprotective and Blood-Retinal Barrier-Preserving Effects of Cannabidiol
http://ajp.amjpathol.org/cgi/content/full/168/1/235

Evaluation of cannabidiol in dystonic movement disorders
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=14

Cannabidiol in dystonic movement disorders.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=139

Beneficial and adverse effects of cannabidiol in a Parkinson patient
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=142

Treatment of Meige’s syndrome with cannabidiol.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=114

CANNABIDIOL TO HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS AND EPILEPTIC PATIENTS
http://web.acsalaska.net/~warmgun/es201.html

Chronic administration of cannabidiol to healthy volunteers and epileptic patients.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=42

Neuroprotective effect of (-)Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…f_peroxynitrite

EFFECTS OF CANNABIDIOL IN HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…al/hunting1.htm

The therapeutic rationale for combining tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/16209908

Cannabidiol has a cerebroprotective action
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…iting_mechanism

Cannabidiol as an antipsychotic
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=171

Cannabidiol, a constituent of Cannabis sativa, modulates sleep in rats.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abs…844117?prt=true

Who’s Afraid of Cannabidiol?
http://www.counterpunch.org/gardner07142007.html

Chemical composition

Cannabis: A source of useful pharma compounds
http://www.medpot.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=18608

Pharmacokinetics and cannabinoid action using oral cannabis extract
http://www.pharma-lexicon.com/medic…hp?newsid=29638

Pharmacokinetics of cannabinoids
http://66.218.69.11/search/cache?ei…&icp=1&.intl=us

The chemistry and biological activity of cannabis
http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/bulle….html?print=yes

Differential effects of medical marijuana based on strain and route of administration
http://www.medicalmarijuanaprocon.o…trainsstudy.pdf

What is THC?
http://www.medicalmarijuanaprocon.o…1.0373456855945

Cannabis / Marijuana ( ? 9 -Tetrahydrocannabinol, THC)
http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/inj…gs/cannabis.htm

Chemotherapy

Efficacy of dronabinol alone and in combination
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=191

Dronabinol for supportive therapy in patients with malignant melanoma and liver metastases
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=180

Intractable nausea and vomiting
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=35

An efficient new cannabinoid antiemetic in pediatric oncology
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=7

Dronabinol and prochlorperazine in combination
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=28

Marijuana as antiemetic medicine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=134

Efficacy of tetrahydrocannabinol in patients refractory to standard anti-emetic therapy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=31

Inhalation marijuana as an antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=155

Nabilone versus prochlorperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=120

Nabilone: an alternative antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=123

Antiemetic efficacy of nabilone and alizapride
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=127

Nabilone versus domperidone
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=129

THC or Compazine for the cancer chemotherapy patient
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=34

Comparison of nabilone and prochlorperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=128

Nabilone vs. prochlorperazine for refractory emesis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=146

Nabilone vs. placebo
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=156

Tetrahydroannabinol (THC) vs prochlorperazine as chemotherapy antiemetics.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=30

Comparative trial of the antiemetic effects of THC and haloperidol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=64

Comparison of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and prochlorperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=3

Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=88

Antiemetic effect of tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=6

Tetrahydrocanabinol versus metoclopramide and thiethylperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=24

Effects of nabilone and prochlorperazine on chemotherapy-induced emesis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=131

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol as an antiemetic
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=5

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol as an antiemetic in cancer patients receiving high-dose methotrexate
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=23

THC as an antiemetic in patients treated with cancer chemotherapy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=27

Amelioration of cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting by delta-9-THC
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=107

Superiority of nabilone over prochlorperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=126

Antiemetic effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=4


Children

Experiences with THC-treatment in children and adolescents
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=80

An efficient new cannabinoid antiemetic in pediatric oncology.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=7

Nabilone versus prochlorperazine for control of cancer chemotherapy-induced emesis in children
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=120

Nabilone: an alternative antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=123

Marijuana and ADD Therapeutic uses of Medical Marijuana in the treatment of ADD
http://www.onlinepot.org/medical/add&mmj.htm

Oily fish makes ’babies brainier’
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4631006.stm

Cannabis is a First-Line Treatment for Childhood Mental Disorders
http://www.counterpunch.org/mikuriya07082006.html

Ganja use among Jamaican women.
http://www.rism.org/isg/dlp/ganja/a…anjaBabyes.html

Dreher’s Jamaican Pregnancy Study
http://www.november.org/stayinfo/br…reherStudy.html

Cannabis Relieves Morning Sickness
http://ccrmg.org/journal/06spr/dreher.html#morning

Moderate cannabis use not harmful to the brain of adolescents, M R I study finds
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=218#3

No brain structural change associated with adolescent cannabis use
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/bo…l&artid=1524733

No ’Smoking’ Gun: Research Indicates Teen Marijuana Use Does Not Predict Drug, Alcohol Abuse
http://www.sciencedaily.com/release…61204123422.htm

Pot May Not Shrink Teens’ Brains After All
http://www.medpagetoday.com/Neurolo…urology/tb/3242

Chronic Cystitis

Cannabinoid rotation in a young woman with chronic cystitis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=115


CPOD

THC effective in appetite and weight loss in severe lung disease (COPD)
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=191#2

Heavy Long-Term Marijuana Use Does Not Impair Lung Function
http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannab…is_media7.shtml

Diabetes

Cannabinoid Reduces Incidence Of Diabetes
http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=6909

Marijuana Compound May Help Stop Diabetic Retinopathy
http://www.sciencedaily.com/release…60227184647.htm

Cannabidiol lowers incidence of diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/conte…sn7o5efqr.alice

Anticoagulant Effects of a Cannabis Extract in an Obese Rat Model
http://www.level1diet.com/research/id/14687

Neuroprotective and Blood-Retinal Barrier-Preserving Effects of Cannabidiol
http://ajp.amjpathol.org/cgi/content/full/168/1/235

The Cannabinergic System as a Target for Anti-inflammatory Therapies
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/conte…000013/art00008

Effect of tetrahydrocurcumin on blood glucose, plasma insulin and hepatic key enzymes
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…d_diabetic_rats

Cannabidiol reduces the development of diabetes in an animal study
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=219#3

Depression

Cannabinoids promote hippocampus neurogenesis and produce anxiolytic- and antidepressant
http://www.jci.org/cgi/content/full/115/11/3104

Antidepressant-like activity by blockade of anandamide hydrolysis
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/ar…bmedid=16352709

Decreased depression in marijuana users.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/15964704

Antidepressant-like activity
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/ar…bmedid=16352709

Dronabinol and marijuana in HIV-positive marijuana smokers: caloric intake, mood, and sleep.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=190

Nabilone improves pain and symptom management in cancer patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=177

The perceived effects of smoked cannabis on patients with multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=13

Cannabis and Depression
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/cmu/…nd_cannabis.htm

Association between cannabis use and depression may not be causal, study says
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=177#4

Marijuana use and depression among adults: Testing for causal associations.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…Pubmed_RVDocSum

Do patients use marijuana as an antidepressant?
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…Pubmed_RVDocSum

Dermatitis

Efficacy of dietary hempseed oil in patients with atopic dermatitis.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abs…ryText=hempseed

Dronabinol

Dronabinol in the treatment of agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease with anorexia
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=61

Dronabinol in the treatment of refractory agitation in Alzheimer’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=92

Effects of dronabinol on anorexia and disturbed behavior in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=59

Dronabinol an effective appetite stimulant?
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=188

Safety and efficacy of dronabinol in the treatment of agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=61

Effect of dronabinol on nutritional status in HIV infection.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=150

Dronabinol stimulates appetite and causes weight gain in HIV patients.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=20

Dronabinol effects on weight in patients with HIV infection.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=45

Recent clinical experience with dronabinol.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=90

Dronabinol enhancement of appetite in cancer patients.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=149

Dronabinol for supportive therapy in patients with malignant melanoma and liver metastases.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=180

Dronabinol and prochlorperazine in combination
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=28

Dronabinol enhancement of appetite in cancer patients.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=149

Efficacy of dronabinol alone and in combination
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=191

Dronabinol and marijuana in HIV-positive marijuana smokers: caloric intake, mood, and sleep.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=190

Dronabinol and retinal hemodynamics in humans.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=202

Dronabinol reduces signs and symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=181

Nausea relieved by tetrahydrocannabinol (dronabinol).
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=35

Dronabinol in patients with intractable pruritus secondary to cholestatic liver disease.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=116

Treatment of spasticity in spinal cord injury with dronabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=112

Cannabinoid Activator Mellows Out Colon
http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/ACG/tb/4410

Drug testing

Hemp oil causes positive urine tests for THC
http://www.druglibrary.org/crl/drug…0JAnToxicol.pdf

Dystonia

Cannabis sativa and dystonia secondary to Wilson’s disease.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/15390041

Experiences with THC-treatment in children and adolescents
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=80

Evaluation of cannabidiol in dystonic movement disorders
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=14

Cannabidiol in dystonic movement disorders.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=139

Beneficial and adverse effects of cannabidiol in a Parkinson patient
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=142

Treatment of Meige’s syndrome with cannabidiol.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=114

Endocannabinoid Deficiency

Clinical Endocannabinoid Deficiency
http://www.freedomtoexhale.com/clinical.pdf

The endocannabinoid system is dysregulated in multiple sclerosis
http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/cgi…stract/awm160v1

Cannabinoids inhibit neurodegeneration in models of multiple sclerosis
http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/cgi…ull/126/10/2191

Epilepsy

Epilepsy patients are smoking pot
http://www.safeaccessnow.org/article.php?id=1638

CANNABIDIOL TO HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS AND EPILEPTIC PATIENTS
http://web.acsalaska.net/~warmgun/es201.html

Experiences with THC-treatment in children and adolescents
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=80

Chronic administration of cannabidiol to healthy volunteers and epileptic patients.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=42

Anticonvulsant nature of marihuana smoking.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=39

Cannabis may help epileptics
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/4423.php

Hypnotic and Antiepileptic Effects of Cannabidiol
http://www.thecompassionclub.org/me…rue&pageNumber=

Marijuana: an effective antiepileptic treatment in partial epilepsy?
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=157

Familial Mediterranean Fever

Pain relief with oral cannabinoids in familial Mediterranean fever.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=18

Fertility

Synthetic Cannabinoid May Aid Fertility In Smokers
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/58063.php

Fever

A Novel Role of Cannabinoids
http://ccicnewsletter.com/index.php…nfectious_Disea

A Cooling Effect From Cannabis?
http://ccrmg.org/journal/05aut/coolcannabis.html

Fibromyalgia

Delta-9-THC based monotherapy in fibromyalgia patients
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/16834825

Clinical Endocannabinoid Deficiency
http://www.freedomtoexhale.com/clinical.pdf

Cannabis Sativa (Marijuana) for Fibromyalgia
http://www.fibromyalgia-reviews.com/Drg_Marijuana.cfm

THC Reduces Pain in Fibromyalgia Patients
http://www.illinoisnorml.org/content/view/63/35/

Gateway Theory

The Myth of Marijuana’s Gateway Effect
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/library/mjgate.htm

Endogenous cannabinoids are not involved in cocaine reinforcement
http://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc…a4e861a90579fac

No ’Smoking’ Gun: Research Indicates Teen Marijuana Use Does Not Predict Drug, Alcohol Abuse
http://www.sciencedaily.com/release…61204123422.htm

CLAIM #13:MARIJUANA IS A “GATEWAY” TO THE USE OF OTHER DRUGS
http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannab…is_myth13.shtml

Glaucoma

Marijuana Smoking vs Cannabinoids for Glaucoma Therapy
http://archopht.ama-assn.org/cgi/co…act/116/11/1433

Dronabinol and retinal hemodynamics in humans.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=202

Effect of Sublingual Application of Cannabinoids on Intraocular Pressure
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=201

Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in cancer chemotherapy. Ophthalmologic implications.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=88

Effect of marihuana on intraocular and blood pressure in glaucoma.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=87

Effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on intraocular pressure in humans.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=40

Marihuana smoking and intraocular pressure.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=47

Neuroprotective and Intraocular Pressure-Lowering Effects of (-)Delta-Tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…del_of_Glaucoma

Neuroprotective effect of (-)Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…f_peroxynitrite

Effects of tetrahydrocannabinol on arterial and intraocular hypertension.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/468444

Gynecology and obstetrics

Cannabis Treatments in Obstetrics and Gynecology: A Historical Review
http://www.freedomtoexhale.com/russo-ob.pdf

Heart Disease/ Cardiovascular

Marijuana Chemical Fights Hardened Arteries
http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/…rdened-arteries

The endogenous cardiac cannabinoid system: a new protective mechanism
http://www.cannabinoid.com/boards/thd3x10073.shtml

Cardiovascular pharmacology of cannabinoids.
http://www.biowizard.com/story.php?pmid=16596789

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol protects cardiac cells from hypoxia
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/conte…020001/00002346

Does Cannabis Hold the Key to Treating Cardiometabolic Disease?
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/525040_print

Cannabinoid Offers Cardioprotection
http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Grou…tm_format=print

Heavy Cannabis Use Not Independently Associated With Cardiovascular Risks
http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=6972

Marijuana use, diet, body mass index, and cardiovascular risk factors
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/16893701

Cannabinoids and cardiovascular disease
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…ical_treatments

Cannabinoids as therapeutic agents in cardiovascular disease
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…s_and_illusions

The in vitro and in vivo cardiovascular effects of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…_oxide_synthase

Cannabinoids prevented the development of heart failure in animal study
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=145#2

Cannabis use not associated with risk factors for diseases of heart and circulation
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=225#2

THC protects heart cells in the case of lowered oxygen supply
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=212#1

Medical marijuana: study shows that THC slows atherosclerosis
http://thenexthurrah.typepad.com/th…al_marijua.html

Cardiovascular Effects of Cannabis
http://www.idmu.co.uk/canncardio.htm

Changes in middle cerebral artery velocity after marijuana
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…0&dopt=Abstract[/]

Hepatitis

Moderate Cannabis Use Associated with Improved Treatment Response
http://www.hivandhepatitis.com/hep_…6/091506_a.html

Cannabis use improves retention and virological outcomes in patients treated for hepatitis C
http://www.natap.org/2006/HCV/091506_02.htm

Hepatitis C – The Silent Killer Can Medical Cannabis Help?
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/cmu/hepatitis_c.htm

Herpes

Cannabis May Help Combat Cancer-causing Herpes Viruses
http://www.sciencedaily.com/release…40923092627.htm

THC inhibits lytic replication of gamma oncogenic herpes viruses in vitro
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/bo…ml&artid=521080

Suppressive effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on herpes simplex virus infectivity in vitro
http://www.ebmonline.org/cgi/content/abstract/196/4/401

Inhibition of cell-associated herpes simplex virus
http://www.ebmonline.org/cgi/content/abstract/185/1/41

The Effect of Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol on Herpes Simplex Virus Replication
http://vir.sgmjournals.org/cgi/cont…stract/49/2/427

Hiccups

Marijuana cures hiccups
http://www.yourhealthbase.com/database/a77k.htm

Marijuana For Intractable Hiccups
http://cannabislink.ca/medical/hiccups.html

HIV / AIDS

Marijuana Use Does Not Accelerate HIV Infection
http://paktribune.com/news/print.php?id=139255

THC improves appetite and reverses weight loss in AIDS patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=189

Dronabinol and marijuana in HIV-positive marijuana smokers: caloric intake, mood, and sleep.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=190

Cannabis in painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=199

Smoked cannabis therapy for HIV-related painful peripheral neuropathy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=172

Short-term effects of cannabinoids in patients with HIV-1 infection
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=62

Dronabinol as a treatment for anorexia associated with weight loss in patients with AIDS.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=21

Effect of dronabinol on nutritional status in HIV infection.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=150

Dronabinol stimulates appetite and causes weight gain in HIV patients.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=20

Dronabinol effects on weight in patients with HIV infection.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=45

Recent clinical experience with dronabinol.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=90

Marijuana as therapy for people living with HIV/AIDS: Social and health aspects
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…_health_aspects

Marijuana and AIDS: A Four-Year Study
http://ccrmg.org/journal/05spr/aids.html

Historical studies

The La Guardia Committee Report
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…lag/lagmenu.htm

Physical, Mental, and Moral Effects of Marijuana: The Indian Hemp Drugs Commission Report
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/Library/effects.htm

MARIAJUANA SMOKING IN PANAMA
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…ama/panama1.htm

The British Pharmaceutical Codex – 1934
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…ical/brit34.htm

ON THE PREPARATIONS OF THE INDIAN HEMP, OR GUNJAH
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…1850/gunjah.htm

DISPENSATORY OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Fifth Edition (1843)
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…ry/dispensa.htm

New Remedies:Pharmaceutically and Therapeutically Considered Fourth Edition (1843)
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…ry/dunglisn.htm

On the Haschisch or Cannabis Indica
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…ry/bellhash.htm

ON INDICATIONS OF THE HACHISH-VICE IN THE OLD TESTAMENT
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…tory/hashot.htm

The Physiological Activity of Cannabis Sativa
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…istory/japa.htm

CANNABIS, U.S.P. (American Cannabis):
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…ry/vbchmed1.htm

Hormones

Effects of chronic marijuana use on testosterone, luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating …
http://www.anesth.uiowa.edu/readabs…sp?PMID=1935564

Marijuana: interaction with the estrogen receptor
http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/cgi/c…tract/224/2/404

Huntington’s Disease

EFFECTS OF CANNABIDIOL IN HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer…al/hunting1.htm

Nabilone Could Treat Chorea and Irritability in Huntington’s Disease
http://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/c…/18/4/553?rss=1

Hysterectomy

Effect of nabilone on nausea and vomiting after total abdominal hysterectomy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=137

Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

Dronabinol reduces signs and symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=181

IQ

Findings of a longitudinal study of effects on IQ
http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/content/full/166/7/887

Heavy cannabis use without long-term effect on global intelligence
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=115#2

Marijuana does not dent IQ permanently
http://www.newscientist.com/article…ermanently.html

Marinol/Synthetic/ cannabinoid mixtures

CANNABIS AND MARINOL IN THE TREATMENT OF MIGRAINE HEADACHE
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/hemp/migrn2.htm

Marinol vs Natural Cannabis
http://www.norml.org/pdf_files/NORM…al_Cannabis.pdf

The therapeutic rationale for combining tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/16209908

Unheated Cannabis sativa extracts and its major compound THC-acid
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abs…504929?prt=true

Side effects of pharmaceuticals not elicited by comparable herbal medicines.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/10394675

Sativex in the treatment of pain caused by rheumatoid arthritis
http://rheumatology.oxfordjournals….bstract/45/1/50

Is dronabinol an effective appetite stimulant?
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=188

Sativex in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis associated detrusor overactivity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=168

Sativex® in patients with symptoms of spasticity due to multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=169

Nabilone improves pain and symptom management in cancer patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=177

Dronabinol for supportive therapy in patients with malignant melanoma and liver metastases
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=180

Synthetic cannabinomimetic nabilone on patients with chronic pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=197

Nabilone significantly reduces spasticity-related pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=200

Sativex produced significant improvements in a subjective measure of spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=170

Analgesic effect of the synthetic cannabinoid CT-3 on chronic neuropathic pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=85

Cannabinoid rotation in a young woman with chronic cystitis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=115

Dronabinol in patients with intractable pruritus
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=116

Cannabinoids reduce levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson’s disease:
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=54

Nabilone on L-DOPA induced dyskinesia in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=153

Nabilone in the treatment of multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=11

Big Pharma’s Strange Holy Grail: Cannabis Without Euphoria?
http://www.counterpunch.org/gardner07082006.html

Sativex showed positive effects in 65 per cent of patients with chronic diseases
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=230#4


Meige’s Syndrome

Treatment of Meige’s syndrome with cannabidiol.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=114

Migraine/ Headache

CANNABIS AND MARINOL IN THE TREATMENT OF MIGRAINE HEADACHE
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/hemp/migrn2.htm

Dronabinol reduces signs and symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=181

Cannabis and Migraine
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/cmu/…nd_migraine.htm

Clinical Endocannabinoid Deficiency
http://www.freedomtoexhale.com/clinical.pdf

Hemp for Headache
http://www.freedomtoexhale.com/hh.pdf

Chronic Migraine Headache
http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/hemp/migrn1.htm

Morning Sickness
Medical marijuana: a surprising solution to severe morning sicknesshttp://www.findarticles.com/p/artic…124/ai_n6015580

Medicinal cannabis use among childbearing women
http://safeaccess.ca/research/cannabis_nausea2006.pdf

Mortality Rates

Marijuana use and mortality.
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/ar…i?artid=1380837

Marijuana Smoking Doesn’t Lead to Higher Death Rate
http://ccrmg.org/journal/03sum/kaiser.html

How deadly is marijuana?
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/4426.php

MS

Sativex in patients with symptoms of spasticity due to multiple sclerosis
http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1517/14656566.7.5.607

Marijuana derivatives may provide MS treatment
http://www.healthypages.net/news.asp?newsid=5381

Marijuana Helps MS Patients Alleviate Pain, Spasms
http://www.mult-sclerosis.org/news/…smsAndPain.html

Cannabis-based medicine in central pain in multiple sclerosis
http://www.neurology.org/cgi/conten…t/65/6/812?etoc

Cannabis-based medicine in spasticity caused by multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=192

Sativex in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis associated detrusor overactivity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=168

The effect of cannabis on urge incontinence in patients with multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=185

Nabilone significantly reduces spasticity-related pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=200

Cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis (CAMS) study
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=160

Sativex produced significant improvements in a subjective measure of spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=170

Cannabis-based medicine in central pain in multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=175

Do cannabis-based medicinal extracts have general or specific effects
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=56

Efficacy, safety and tolerability of an oral cannabis extract in the treatment of spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=63

cannabis-based extracts for bladder dysfunction in advanced multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=81

Are oral cannabinoids safe and effective in refractory neuropathic pain?
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=143

Dronabinol in the treatment of agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease with anorexia
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=61

Cannabis based medicinal extracts (CBME) in central neuropathic pain due to multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=82

Cannabinoids for treatment of spasticity and other symptoms related to multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=108

Cannabis based medicinal extract on refractory lower urinary tract dysfunction
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=103

Analgesic effect of the cannabinoid analogue nabilone
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=203

The perceived effects of smoked cannabis on patients with multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=13

Orally and rectally administered delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=12

Nabilone in the treatment of multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=11

Effect of cannabinoids on spasticity and ataxia in multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=2

Delta-9-THC in the treatment of spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=1

Tetrahydrocannabinol for tremor in multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=9

Marihuana as a therapeutic agent for muscle spasm or spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=53

Cannabis-based medicine in spasticity caused by multiple sclerosis.
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…tiple_sclerosis

Cannabis based treatments for neuropathic and multiple sclerosis-related pain.
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…is_related_pain

The effect of cannabis on urge incontinence in patients with multiple sclerosis
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…ial__CAMS_LUTS_

Can Cannabis Help Multiple Sclerosis? An International Debate Rages
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/cmu/…bis_help_ms.htm

Cannabis’ Potential Exciting Researchers in Treatment of ALS, Parkinson’s Disease
http://66.218.69.11/search/cache?ei…&icp=1&.intl=us

The endocannabinoid system is dysregulated in multiple sclerosis
http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/cgi…stract/awm160v1

Cannabinoids inhibit neurodegeneration in models of multiple sclerosis
http://brain.oxfordjournals.org/cgi…ull/126/10/2191

Nabilone

The synthetic cannabinoid nabilone improves pain and symptom management in cancer patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=177

Nabilone versus prochlorperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=120

Nabilone: an alternative antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=123

Antiemetic efficacy of nabilone and alizapride
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=127

Nabilone versus domperidone
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=129

Comparison of nabilone and prochlorperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=128

Nabilone vs. prochlorperazine for refractory emesis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=146

Nabilone vs. placebo
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=156

Effects of nabilone and prochlorperazine on chemotherapy-induced emesis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=131

Superiority of nabilone over prochlorperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=126

Nabilone versus prochlorperazine for control of cancer chemotherapy-induced emesis in children
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=120

Nabilone: an alternative antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=123

Effect of nabilone on nausea and vomiting after total abdominal hysterectomy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=137

Nabilone improves pain and symptom management in cancer patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=177

Synthetic cannabinomimetic nabilone on patients with chronic pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=197

Nabilone significantly reduces spasticity-related pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=200

Nabilone on L-DOPA induced dyskinesia in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=153

Nabilone in the treatment of multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=11

Nabilone significantly reduces spasticity-related pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=200

Analgesic effect of the cannabinoid analogue nabilone
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=203

Nabilone in the treatment of multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=11

Comparison of nabilone and metoclopramide in the control of radiation-induced nausea.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=130

Nabilone and metoclopramide in the treatment of nausea and vomiting
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=121

Nabilone: an alternative antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=123

Comparison of the antiemetic efficacy of nabilone and alizapride
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=127

Nabilone versus domperidone in the treatment of cytotoxic-induced emesis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=129

Add-on treatment with the synthetic cannabinomimetic nabilone on patients with chronic pain –
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=197

Comparison of bronchial effects of nabilone and terbutaline
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=43

Nabilone Could Treat Chorea and Irritability in Huntington’s Disease
http://neuro.psychiatryonline.org/c…/18/4/553?rss=1

Nausea

THC improves appetite and reverses weight loss in AIDS patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=189

Efficacy of dronabinol alone and in combination with ondansetron versus ondansetron alone
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=191

Dronabinol and marijuana in HIV-positive marijuana smokers: caloric intake, mood, and sleep.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=190

Nabilone improves pain and symptom management in cancer patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=177

Dronabinol for supportive therapy in patients with malignant melanoma and liver metastases.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=180

Nausea relieved by tetrahydrocannabinol (dronabinol).
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=35

An efficient new cannabinoid antiemetic in pediatric oncology.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=7

Effect of nabilone on nausea and vomiting after total abdominal hysterectomy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=137

Marijuana as antiemetic medicine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=134

Efficacy of tetrahydrocannabinol in patients refractory to standard anti-emetic therapy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=31

Inhalation marijuana as an antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=155

Nabilone versus prochlorperazine for control of cancer chemotherapy-induced emesis in children
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=120

Comparison of nabilone and metoclopramide in the control of radiation-induced nausea.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=130

Nabilone and metoclopramide in the treatment of nausea and vomiting
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=121

Nabilone: an alternative antiemetic for cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=123

Comparison of the antiemetic efficacy of nabilone and alizapride
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=127

Nabilone versus domperidone in the treatment of cytotoxic-induced emesis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=129

THC or Compazine for the cancer chemotherapy patient—the UCLA study
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=34

Comparison of nabilone and prochlorperazine for emesis induced by cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=128

Acute and subacute bronchial effects of oral cannabinoids.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=44

Nabilone vs. prochlorperazine for refractory emesis induced by cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=146

Nabilone vs. placebo in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=156

Dose vs response of tetrahydroannabinol (THC) vs prochlorperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=30 delta 9-

Comparative trial of the antiemetic effects of THC and haloperidol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=64

Comparison of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and prochlorperazine.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=3

Tetrahydrocannabinol in cancer chemotherapy. Ophthalmologic implications.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=88

Antiemetic effect of tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=6

The antiemetic activity of tetrahydrocanabinol versus metoclopramide and thiethylperazine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=24

The antiemetic effects of nabilone and prochlorperazine on chemotherapy-induced emesis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=131

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol as an antiemetic for patients receiving cancer chemotherapy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=5

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol as an antiemetic in cancer patients receiving high-dose methotrexate
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=23

THC as an antiemetic in patients treated with cancer chemotherapy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=27

Amelioration of cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting by delta-9-THC.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=107

Superiority of nabilone over prochlorperazine as an antiemetic
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=126

Antiemetic effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=4

Receptor mechanism and antiemetic activity of structurally-diverse cannabinoids
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…the_least_shrew


Neurons

Marijuana Promotes Neuron Growth
http://www.medpot.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=27460

Marijuana-Like Chemicals in the Brain Calm Neurons
http://www.medpot.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=9686

Marijuana May Spur New Brain Cells
http://www.treatingyourself.com/vbu…read.php?t=5921

Cannabinoids promote embryonic and adult hippocampus neurogenesis
http://www.jci.org/cgi/content/full/115/11/3104

Medical marijuana uses – 700 medical marijuana clinical studies and papers

Neuropathic pain

Cannabinoids Among Most Promising Approaches to Treating Neuropathic Pain
http://www.redorbit.com/news/health…source=r_health

Cannabis-based medicine in central pain in multiple sclerosis
http://www.neurology.org/cgi/conten…t/65/6/812?etoc

Cannabis in painful HIV-associated sensory neuropathy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=199

Smoked cannabis therapy for HIV-related painful peripheral neuropathy
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=172

Two cannabis based medicinal extracts for relief of central neuropathic pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=143

Cannabis based medicinal extracts (CBME) in central neuropathic pain due to multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=82

Analgesic effect of the synthetic cannabinoid CT-3 on chronic neuropathic pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=85

Smoked cannabis in painful peripheral neuropathy and cancer pain refractory to opiods.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=96

Analgesic effect of the cannabinoid analogue nabilone
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=203

The perceived effects of smoked cannabis on patients with multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=13

Cannabis based treatments for neuropathic and multiple sclerosis-related pain.
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…is_related_pain


Neuroprotectant

Marijuana Protects Your Brain
http://www.roninpub.com/art-mjbrain.html

The neuroprotective effect of cannabinoids in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/17196181

Neuroprotective and Intraocular Pressure-Lowering Effects of (-)Delta-THC
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…del_of_Glaucoma

Neuroprotective effect of (-)Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…f_peroxynitrite

Neuroprotection induced by Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in AF5 cells
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…ol_in_AF5_cells

Cannabidiol has a cerebroprotective action
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…iting_mechanism

Cannabidiol but not Delta(9)-THC has a neuroprotective effect without the development of tolerance..
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…nt_of_tolerance

Delta(9)-THC) prevents cerebral infarction
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…ent_hypothermia

Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol protects hippocampal neurons from excitotoxicity
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…_excitotoxicity

Cannabis and Neuroprotection
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/cmu/…oprotection.htm

Nutrition

Oily fish makes ’babies brainier’
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4631006.stm

Efficacy of dietary hempseed oil in patients with atopic dermatitis.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abs…ryText=hempseed

Effects of smoked marijuana on food intake and body weight
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=117

Obesity

Does Cannabis Hold the Key to Treating Cardiometabolic Disease?
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/525040_print

Effects of smoked marijuana on food intake and body weight
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=117

Osteoporosis

Prototype drug to prevent osteoporosis based on cannabinoids
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=15220

Hebrew U. Researchers Find Cannabis Can Strengthen Bones
http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/96146

Peripheral cannabinoid receptor, CB2, regulates bone mass
http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/103/3/696

New Weapon In Battle Against Osteoporosis
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/35621.php

Activation of CB2 receptor attenuates bone loss in osteoporosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=210#2

Pain-

Cannabis effective at relieving pain after major surgery
http://www.news-medical.net/?id=17995

Cannabinoids, in combination with (NSAIDS), produce a synergistic analgesic effect
http://www.medjournal.com/forum/sho…587&postcount=1

Cannabinoids Among Most Promising Approaches to Treating Neuropathic Pain,
http://www.redorbit.com/news/health…source=r_health

Cannabinoid analgesia as a potential new therapeutic option
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/16449552

Analgesic and adverse effects of an oral cannabis extract (Cannador) for postoperative pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=184

Delta-9-THC based monotherapy in fibromyalgia patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=194

Add-on treatment with the synthetic cannabinomimetic nabilone on patients with chronic pain –
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=197

Nabilone significantly reduces spasticity-related pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=200

Synergistic affective analgesic interaction between delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and morphine.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=178

Are oral cannabinoids safe and effective in refractory neuropathic pain?
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=143

Dronabinol in the treatment of agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease with anorexia
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=61

Cannabis use for chronic non-cancer pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=91

Tetrahydrocannabinol for treatment of chronic pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=147

Analgesic effect of the cannabinoid analogue nabilone
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=203

The perceived effects of smoked cannabis on patients with multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=13

Pain relief with oral cannabinoids in familial Mediterranean fever.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=18

The effect of orally and rectally administered delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=12

Marihuana as a therapeutic agent for muscle spasm or spasticity.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=53

Analgesic effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=16

The analgesic properties of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and codeine.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=17

Most pain patients gain benefit from cannabis in a British study
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…kel.php?id=84#1

Parkinson’s Disease

Marijuana Compounds May Aid Parkinson’s Disease
http://cannabisnews.com/news/19/thread19725.shtml

Marijuana-Like Chemicals Helps Treat Parkinson’s
http://cannabisnews.com/news/22/thread22608.shtml

Cannabis use in Parkinson’s disease: subjective improvement of motor symptoms.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=33

Cannabinoids reduce levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=54

Nabilone on L-DOPA induced dyskinesia in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=153

Evaluation of cannabidiol in dystonic movement disorders.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=14

Beneficial and adverse effects of cannabidiol in a Parkinson patient
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=142

Neuroprotective effect of cannabinoids in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/17196181

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

IDF TO TREAT SHELL SHOCK WITH CANNABIS
http://www.onlinepot.org/medical/id…sshellshock.htm

Study: Marijuana Eases Traumatic Memories
http://cannabisnews.com/news/13/thread13601.shtml

Medical Marijuana: PTSD Medical Malpractice
http://salem-news.com/articles/june…veque_61407.php

Cannabis for the Wounded – Another Walter Reed Scandal
http://www.libertypost.org/cgi-bin/…=179973&Disp=11

PTSD and Cannabis: A Clinician Ponders Mechanism of Action
http://ccrmg.org/journal/06spr/perspective2.html

Cannabis Eases Post Traumatic Stress
http://ccrmg.org/journal/06spr/ptsd.html

Endocannabinoids extinguish bad memories in the brain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=123#1

Natural high helps banish bad memories
http://www.newscientist.com/article…d-memories.html

Pregnancy

Oily fish makes ’babies brainier’
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4631006.stm

Ganja use among Jamaican women.
http://www.rism.org/isg/dlp/ganja/a…anjaBabyes.html

Dreher’s Jamaican Pregnancy Study
http://www.november.org/stayinfo/br…reherStudy.html

Cannabis Relieves Morning Sickness
http://ccrmg.org/journal/06spr/dreher.html#morning

Prenatal Marijuana Exposure and Neonatal Outcomes in Jamaica
http://www.druglibrary.org/Schaffer…/can-babies.htm

The Endocannabinoid-CB Receptor System
http://www.nel.edu/pdf_/25_12/NEL251204A01_Fride_.pdf

CLAIM #7: MARIJUANA USE DURING PREGNANCY HARMS THE FETUS
http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannab…bis_myth7.shtml

Prenatal exposure

Prenatal Marijuana Exposure and Neonatal Outcomes in Jamaica
http://www.druglibrary.org/Schaffer…/can-babies.htm

The Endocannabinoid-CB Receptor System
http://www.nel.edu/pdf_/25_12/NEL251204A01_Fride_.pdf

Ganja use among Jamaican women.
http://www.rism.org/isg/dlp/ganja/a…anjaBabyes.html

Dreher’s Jamaican Pregnancy Study
http://www.november.org/stayinfo/br…reherStudy.html

Nonmutagenic action of cannabinoids in vitro
http://trophort.com/005/993/005993433.html

Prenatal exposure to tobacco, alcohol, cannabis and caffeine on birth size and subsequent growth.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…st_uids=3657756

Tobacco and marijuana use on offspring growth from birth through 3 years of age.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…Pubmed_RVDocSum

Prenatal marijuana use and neonatal outcome.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…Pubmed_RVDocSum

Pruritis

Cream with endocannabinoids effective in the treatment of pruritus
http://bbsnews.net/article.php/20051211212223236/print

Topical cannabinoid agonists : An effective new possibility for treating chronic pruritus.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=196

Dronabinol in patients with intractable pruritus secondary to cholestatic liver disease.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=116

Sativex

Sativex in the treatment of pain caused by rheumatoid arthritis
http://rheumatology.oxfordjournals….bstract/45/1/50

Sativex produced significant improvements in a subjective measure of spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=170

Sativex in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=168

Sativex in patients suffering from multiple sclerosis associated detrusor overactivity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=168

Sativex showed positive effects in 65 per cent of patients with chronic diseases
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=230#4

Schizophrenia/ Mental disorders

Increased cannabinoid receptor density in the posterior cingulate cortex in schizophrenia.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/16710682

Symptoms of schizotypy precede cannabis use.
http://www.ukcia.org/forum/read.php?7,7543,7579

Cannabidiol as an antipsychotic
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=171

Anandamide levels in cerebrospinal fluid of first-episode schizophrenic patients
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…of_cannabis_use

Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-Induced Effects on Psychosis and Cognition
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…s_and_Cognition

Cannabis is a First-Line Treatment for Childhood Mental Disorders
http://www.counterpunch.org/mikuriya07082006.html

Cannabis does not induce schizophrenia,
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/12283.php

Cannabis use does not cause schizophrenia
http://www.health.am/psy/more/canna…_schizophrenia/

Cannabinoids and psychosis.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…Pubmed_RVDocSum

Cannabis as a psychotropic medication
http://bjp.rcpsych.org/cgi/content/full/185/1/78

Study Shows Long Term Marijuana Users Healthy
http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannab…_science3.shtml

Cannabis and schizophrenia link blurs further
http://www.newscientist.com/channel…rs-further.html

Evidence does not show a strong causal relation between the use of cannabis and psychosocial harm
http://www.library.nhs.uk/mentalHea…24106&tabID=289

Sickle Cell Disease

Cannabis Relieves Sickle Cell Disease!
http://www.cannabisculture.com/foru…?Number=1155878

Sickle Cell Disease and Cannabis
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/cmu/Sickle_cell.htm

Marijuana smoking in young adults with sickle cell
http://caribbean.scielo.org/scielo….&lng=en&nrm=iso

Medical use of cannabis in sickle cell disease
http://www.chanvre-info.ch/info/it/…-in-sickle.html

Cannabis use in sickle cell disease: a questionnaire study.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…2&dopt=Abstract

Sleep modulation

Cannabidiol, a constituent of Cannabis sativa, modulates sleep in rats.
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abs…844117?prt=true

Dronabinol reduces signs and symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=181

Cannabis-based medicine in central pain in multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=175

Two cannabis based medicinal extracts for relief of central neuropathic pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=15

Functional role for cannabinoids in respiratory stability during sleep
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/cmu/…sleep_apnea.htm

THC reduces sleep apnoea in animal research
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=120#1

Spasticity

The treatment of spasticity with Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in persons with spinal cord injury.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=166

Cannabis-based medicine in spasticity caused by multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=192

Cannabinoids in multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=160

Sativex produced significant improvements in a subjective measure of spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=170

Do cannabis-based medicinal extracts have general or specific effects on symptoms in ms?
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=56

Efficacy, safety and tolerability of an oral cannabis extract in the treatment of spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=63

Are oral cannabinoids safe and effective in refractory neuropathic pain?
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=143

Experiences with THC-treatment in children and adolescents
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=80

The treatment of spasticity with D9-THC in patients with spinal cord injury
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=79

The effect of orally and rectally administered delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=12

Nabilone in the treatment of multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=11

Treatment of spasticity in spinal cord injury with dronabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=112

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol shows antispastic and analgesic effects
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=10

Effect of cannabinoids on spasticity and ataxia in multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=2

Delta-9-THC in the treatment of spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=1

Effect of Delta-9-THC on EMG Measurements in Human Spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=110

The effect of delta-9-THC on human spasticity.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=154

Cannabis effect on spasticity in spinal cord injury.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=113

Treatment of human spasticity with delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…show.php?s_id=8

Marihuana as a therapeutic agent for muscle spasm or spasticity.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=53

The perceived effects of marijuana on spinal cord injured males.
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=138

Motor effects of delta 9 THC in cerebellar Lurcher mutant mice.
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…her_mutant_mice

Cannabis-based medicine in spasticity caused by multiple sclerosis
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…tiple_sclerosis

Spinal Cord Injury

The treatment of spasticity with Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in persons with spinal cord injury http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=166

Are oral cannabinoids safe and effective in refractory neuropathic pain?
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=143

The treatment of spasticity with D9-THC) in patients with spinal cord injury
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=79

Delta-9-THC as an alternative therapy for overactive bladders in spinal cord injury
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=102

The effect of orally and rectally administered delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=12

Treatment of spasticity in spinal cord injury with dronabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=112

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol shows antispastic and analgesic effects
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=10

The effect of delta-9-THC on human spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=154

Cannabis effect on spasticity in spinal cord injury
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=113

Marihuana as a therapeutic agent for muscle spasm or spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=53

The perceived effects of marijuana on spinal cord injured males
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=138

Stroke

Cannabidiol has a cerebroprotective action
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…iting_mechanism

Delta(9)-THC) prevents cerebral infarction
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…ent_hypothermia

Medical marijuana: study shows that THC slows atherosclerosis
http://thenexthurrah.typepad.com/th…al_marijua.html


Tea as medicine

Cannabis tea revisited: A systematic evaluation
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…Pubmed_RVDocSum

THC/tetrahydrocannabinol

THC is effective in the treatment of tics in Tourette syndrome
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=98

THC effective in Tourette-Syndrome
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/cmu/tourette_thc.htm

THC effective in Tourette syndrome in a 6-week trial
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=146#1

Treatment of Tourette’s Syndrome With Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol
http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi…/full/156/3/495

THC inhibits primary marker of Alzheimer’s disease
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=225#3

THC improves appetite and reverses weight loss in AIDS patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=189

Cancer-related anorexia-cachexia syndrome
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…xia_Study_Group

THC effective in appetite and weight loss in severe lung disease (COPD)
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=191#2

The antinociceptive effect of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in the arthritic rat
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…binoid_receptor

Synergy between Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and morphine in the arthritic rat
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…e_arthritic_rat

Bronchial effects of aerosolized delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=109

Bronchodilator effect of delta1-tetrahydrocannabinol administered by aerosol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=60

Effects of smoked marijuana in experimentally induced asthma
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=57

Marijuana and oral delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol on specific airway conductance
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=67

New Synthetic Delta-9-THC Inhaler Offers Safe, Rapid Delivery
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/22937.php

Smoked marijuana and oral delta-9-THC on specific airway conductance in asthmatic subjects
http://www.ukcia.org/research/Smoke…InAsthmatic.php

Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=193

9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Inhibits Cell Cycle Progression in Human Breast Cancer
http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/c…ract/66/13/6615

THC and prochlorperazine effective in reducing vomiting in women following breast surgery
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=219#1

Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-Induced Apoptosis in Jurkat Leukemia T Cells
http://mcr.aacrjournals.org/cgi/con…bstract/4/8/549

Delta(9)-THC) prevents cerebral infarction
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…ent_hypothermia

Medical marijuana: study shows that THC slows atherosclerosis
http://thenexthurrah.typepad.com/th…al_marijua.html

Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol shows antispastic and analgesic effects
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=10

The effect of delta-9-THC on human spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=154

The treatment of spasticity with D9-THC) in patients with spinal cord injury
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=79

Delta-9-THC as an alternative therapy for overactive bladders in spinal cord injury
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=102

The effect of orally and rectally administered delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=12

The treatment of spasticity with Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol in persons with spinal cord injury
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=166

Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-Induced Effects on Psychosis and Cognition
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…s_and_Cognition

The effect of orally and rectally administered delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=12

Marihuana as a therapeutic agent for muscle spasm or spasticity
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=53

Analgesic effect of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=16

The analgesic properties of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and codeine
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=17

The perceived effects of smoked cannabis on patients with multiple sclerosis
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=13

Cannabis use for chronic non-cancer pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=91

Tetrahydrocannabinol for treatment of chronic pain
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=147

Delta-9-THC based monotherapy in fibromyalgia patients
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=194

Delta(9)-THC) prevents cerebral infarction
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…ent_hypothermia

Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol protects hippocampal neurons from excitotoxicity
http://www.unboundmedicine.com/medl…_excitotoxicity

Tobacco vs Cannabis-

Cannabis Smoke and Cancer: Assessing the Risk
http://www.norml.org/index.cfm?Group_ID=6891

Cannabis and tobacco smoke are not equally carcinogenic
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/ar…i?artid=1277837

Smoking Marijuana Does Not Cause Lung Cancer
http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v05/n1065/a03.html

Tobacco and marijuana use on offspring growth from birth through 3 years of age
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/e…Pubmed_RVDocSum

Progression from marijuana use to daily smoking and nicotine dependence
http://www.erowid.org/references/refs_view.php?ID=6951

High anxieties – What the WHO doesn’t want you to know about cannabis
http://www.newscientist.com/article…t-cannabis.html

Radioactive tobacco
http://www.cannabisculture.com/news/tobacco/

Tourette’s Syndrome

Treatment of Tourette’s Syndrome With Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol
http://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/cgi…/full/156/3/495

THC is effective in the treatment of tics in Tourette syndrome
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=98

Treatment of Tourette’s syndrome with Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…how.php?s_id=99

Cannabinoids: possible role in patho-physiology and therapy of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=100

THC effective in Tourette-Syndrome
http://www.pacifier.com/~alive/cmu/tourette_thc.htm

THC effective in Tourette syndrome in a 6-week trial
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=146#1

Vaporizers

Vaporization as a smokeless cannabis delivery system
http://www.cannabis-med.org/studies…ow.php?s_id=187

Smokeless Cannabis Delivery Device Efficient And Less Toxic
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/71112.php

Volcano is to Vaporizer As Porsche is to Automobile
http://ccrmg.org/journal/04spr/volcano.html

Recommendation to Patients: “Don’t smoke, Vaporize”
http://ccrmg.org/journal/03sum/vaporize.html

Decreased respiratory symptoms in cannabis users who vaporize
http://marijuana.researchtoday.net/archive/4/4/1195.htm

Use of vaporizers reduces toxins from cannabis smoke
http://www.cannabis-med.org/english…el.php?id=146#2

Wilson’s Disease

Cannabis sativa and dystonia secondary to Wilson’s disease
http://www.medscape.com/medline/abstract/15390041

More Hemp facts, here:http://www.thehia.org/facts.html

Hemp#Hempeneering #Cannabis Can

Copied From:http://www.drugwarfacts.org/cms/hemp#sthash.uAdTb7gg.hUz8u9dD.dpbs

Data Table:
Economic Benefits from Hemp in Kentucky

A flyer, “Drug War Facts: Facts About Hemp,” can be downloaded fromhttp://drugwarfacts.org/cms/files/DrugWarFactsHempOverview022014.pdf

Concerns of Toxic “MEDICAL MARIJUANA” Ballot Initiative Petition (Short version)

Concerns of Toxic “MEDICAL MARIJUANA” Ballot Initiative Petition (Short version)

By Pat and Lynn Kempen

Words have meaning, and words we consider placing into our very Constitution must be particularly scrutinized and considered.  The Constitution is a document intended to protect the rights of citizens, and to establish limitations on government’s reach.
cash cowProhibitionist profiteers would make New Approach Missouri’s (NAM’s) Toxic “Medical Marijuana” Proposal their cash cow, but how would NAM’s measure apply to most Missourians?
Under NAM’s measure, few Missourians would be able to afford to enter Missouri’s new elite “Medical Marijuana” industry.  Per NAM’s proposed measure, the Dept. of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) would be granted total authority to subjectively refuse or grant facility licenses to enter the restricted “medical marijuana” industry.

you meanAll Medical Marijuana Facility license applicants begin by paying a $3,000 non-refundable application fee (new non-refundable application fee required every 3 years.)  If fortunate enough to then be granted a license, one then must additionally pay:
$20,000/year for a Cultivation Facility licensing fee;
$10,000/year for a Dispensary Facility licensing fee;
or $10,000/year for an Infused Product Manufacturing Facility licensing fee;
in addition to whatever other limitless fees and requirements DHSS imposes.
Sections 3.(7), (8) and (9) and Sections 3.(1),(2) and (3)


Such fees, and the subjective granting of Facility licenses, would prohibit average Missourians from attempting to enter the new, profitable, “Medical Marijuana” industry.  Of course the price of all NAM’s proposed Big Government “seed to sale” micromanagement of Medical Marijuana will ultimately be paid by the sick and dying patients in need of this non-toxic plant.
Section 3.(7) thru (9), and the rest of the initiative.

The retail price of Medical Marijuana paid by qualifying patients would be without limit.  Additionally, NAM’s proposal protects insurance companies from having to cover Medical Marijuana for qualifying patients.
Section 7.(15)

DHSSNAM’s proposed measure grants almost god-like authority to DHSS to create virtually limitless new rules, regulations, requirements, fees with regard to “Medical Marijuana” in Missouri, and limitless penalties for any infraction thereof.
Section 3.(1),(2),and (3)

 

NAM’s measure permits no elected officials (Sheriff, Circuit Judge, MO Governor, or US President) to “interfere” in ANY way, “directly or indirectly” with DHSS’s authority regarding regulations and penalties DHSS cares to impose for any infraction of their virtually limitless “Medical Marijuana” rules.  While NAM is pitching this proposed measure as if it protects the patients, it really protects and empowers DHSS, and keeps attorneys in business.  NAM’s measure is largely focused on LIMITING citizens’ rights which is antithetical to the very purpose of our Constitution.
Section 3.(22) and 7.(6.)

no gunsQualifying Medical Marijuana patients could say bye-bye to their 2nd Amendment rights under NAM’s “medical marijuana” proposal.  NAM’s proposal does not repudiate federal prohibition, even acknowledges supremacy of Federal law, and declares “Any information released related to patients may be used for purposes authorized by federal law.”       Section 3.(4)

“Medical Marijuana” cards and databases of patient information could be used by the Bureaus of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) and the Department of Justice (DOJ).
DOJ & ATF have already declared “there are no exceptions in Federal law for marijuana purportedly used for medicinal purposes, even if such use is sanctioned by State law.”  Medical Marijuana qualified patients will be prohibited from legally possessing firearms or ammunition.
Open Letter from DOJ to all Federal Firearms Licensees 

Nothing in NAM’s measure curtails Missouri state funds or Missouri law enforcement personnel from assisting in enforcing federal prohibitions; in fact, their proposed measure acknowledges and concedes to supremacy of federal law (Section 7.(13)), as well as that “any court of competent jurisdiction” can adjudge any section or application of this measure to be entirely invalid; potentially voiding their initiative entirely.
Section 8.

Any appeal or denial of license or medical card would be subject to “judicial review as provided by law” of which federal law still prohibits.  Additionally, DHSS would be Constitutionally protected from any elected judge’s rulings, per the wording of NAM’s Constitutional Amendment.
Section 3.(21)

NAM’s proposal does not permit any eligible patient to “operate, navigate, or be in actual physical control of any dangerous device or motor vehicle, aircraft, or motorboat while ‘under the influence of marijuana;’” NOTE: “under the influence” remains undefined, thus ANY eligible patient, who has simply consumed their “Medical Marijuana” in the last month or week, may be prosecuted and convicted for operating “under the influence” per what NAM wants to put in the Missouri Constitution.
Section 7.(1)(c)

NAM’s proposal would not permit a qualifying “Medical Marijuana” patient to file a lawsuit against any employer for discrimination or wrongful termination.  Merely being an approved “Medical Marijuana” patient may be just cause for termination without recourse. They want to put that into the Missouri Constitution.
Section 7.(1)(d)

If an “eligible patient” consumes their “Medical Marijuana” in a public place, sanctions would be provided by current “general law.”  The term “consume” is undefined.  General law still considers considers cannabis possession to be criminal activity (certainly defiant to federal law), so NAM’s proposal puts into the Constitution that such prohibitions still apply.  Nothing in this measure stops Missouri law enforcement from enforcing federal prohibition.
Section 7.(8)
marimoney.pngFor an eligible patient to grow their own cannabis for their own medical needs, they must:
1. Be certified by a physician to do so (doctor office visit, with physician willing to prescribe.)
2. Pay for a $25/annual ID card
3. Pay the $100/year annual personal cultivation license fee.
4. Have an enclosed, locked facility equipped with whatever security devices DHSS decides to require.
5. Pay whatever other fees DHSS comes up with, which may be limitless
6. Purchase up to 6 already “flowering” plants from a Medical Marijuana Dispensary Facility ($$$).
Yet that “eligible patient”, after paying their personal cultivation extra annual licensing fee, and meeting all those requirements will be Constitutionally prohibited from extracting the healing resins for themselves unless they pay the dispensary license ($3,000 additional non-refundable application fee to be submitted every 3 years, plus $10,000/year licensing fee)

Any infraction of patient cultivation requirements is subject to limitless penalties.
It will be cost-prohibitive for most cancer patients to “grow their own” medication, as they are prohibited from cultivating sufficient quantities, as well as prohibited from legally extracting the healing oils or resins for themselves.  The people this “up to 6 plants” limitation benefit, are those who simply want to smoke it.

cuffed

Section 7.(13) of NAM’s proposal is particularly nefarious, proposing to Constitutionally protect Big Pharma by requiring that at least 75% of all physician prescriptions be for pharmaceutical medications other than cannabis……….This^ does NOT belong in our Constitution!!!

Section 7(15) of NAM’s proposal Constitutionally protects insurance companies from having to cover “Medical Marijuana”

Section 7(16) of NAM’s proposal purports that any violation of DHSS’s limitless rules they can enact with regard to “Medical Marijuana” may be subject to asset forfeiture.

Section 8. Of NAM’s proposal suggests any part or all of their measure can be “adjudged invalid by ANY court of competent jurisdiction,” which potentially and readily negates the entire measure, as any federal court will adjudicate that “marijuana” remains a Schedule 1 Controlled Substance, and is federally prohibited.

If you care to examine a more detailed critique of New Approach Missouri’s Measure, please examine Toxic Proposals:
https://patinthehat00.wordpress.com/2016/01/11/missouri-petition-analysis-2016/

World Study

World Study

If you find this BIG GOVERNMENT takeover of the “medical marijuana industry” to be an overt assault on what should be your Constitutional right to the miraculous, nutritious and non-toxic plant that is cannabis, please contact us at Hempeneers.com.  We  have a much better solution to restore this plant to we-the-people, without granting profiteers and Big Government excessive profits, at the price of people in need.

Please, join the movement.
It’s time to bring the discussion to our families, friends, businesses, churches, and communities, and return this plant to We-the-People