Questioning NASA and Testing the “Globe theory”

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photo released by Tim Peake to Flickr from the International Space Station

 

I am only sharing (below) what I see, as what can only be called lies, fraud, errors without explanations or possibly just a “circus” to be put on to keep the funding coming in, and the Truth of Yahuweh(God) out of the minds and hearts (Spiritual warfare). The following is a list of websites that contain many questionable things NASA has shared as fact. I say it is high time to take a closer look at what you think is real and test what you think you know. I may or may not agree with what is within the following but I do think it needs to be considered. Caution, adult language may be used.

Please add any reliable resources into the comments section. If any evidence I show is unreliable please let me know.

Pat

Space station photos bring forth questions about Flat Earth (My Write-up)

The Biggest Lie of All NASA lies! (You tube)

Hubble Shoots The Moon. (Article)

NASA Insider Exposes the Flat Earth! (You tube)

NASA Biggest MISTAKES EVER ARE THEY LYING TO US ? (You tube)

200 Proofs Earth Is Not A Spinning Ball (Article)
200 Proofs Earth is Not a Spinning Ball pdf.

Debunking the Spinning Ball Earth
http://www.atlanteanconspiracy.com/…/debunking-spinning…

Flat Earth Evidence
https://www.youtube.com/playlist…

Earth Hoax? – Part 1 of 2. Don’t Spin Out!
http://www.waykiwayki.com/…/earth-hoax-part-1-of-2-dont…

Earth Hoax? – Part 2 of 2. The Global-Ball-Bull?
http://www.waykiwayki.com/…/earth-hoax-part-2-of-2…

Hard evidence that the earth is not a globe
http://www.debate.org/…/Scientific-evidence…/1/

The Natural Physics of Water Prove Earth Flat
http://www.atlanteanconspiracy.com/…/water-proves-earth…

Sundials and the Flat Earth
http://www.flatearthconspiracy.com/sundials-and-the-flat…/

The Globe Earth Lie
http://www.atlanteanconspiracy.com/…/the-globe-earth…

The Earth is Not Moving
http://www.atlanteanconspiracy.com/…/earth-is-not…
The Flat-Earth Conspiracy
http://www.atlanteanconspiracy.com/…/the-flat-earth…

Antarctica Has No South Pole
http://www.atlanteanconspiracy.com/…/south-pole-does…

Geocentricity is Scientific, Heliocentricity is a Lie!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxMSL9h2ziY

No Curvature on the Flat Earth
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcteYfOMgJg…

Where’s the Edge Then?
http://www.atlanteanconspiracy.com/…/south-pole-does…

Satellites can not be orbiting the earth as it is extremely hot in the Thermosphere which would melt any man-made spaceship. It is about 500° C (932° F) to 2,000° C (3,632° F) or higher. The governments track everything from these stations as they did since many many years ago.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56WTtutQIf4
GPS Before the Satellite Hoax GPS = LORAN
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7RA_Y1lcK6I

Proof that the standard Heliocentric Model is In error:
http://www.wildheretic.com/heliocentric-theory-is-wrong-pt1/

Lunar Wave / Holographic Moon
https://www.youtube.com/playlist…

Prof. Eric Dollard The Sun is not what we wave been told.!!!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z6bE5uvSA9s…

The Flat Earth and its Advocates: A List of References
http://www.loc.gov/rr/scitech/SciRefGuides/flatearth.html

A wise man may change his mind.
A fool never does.(unknown)

I Am A Veteran.

I am a veteran.

I took an oath to protect the freedoms of this country only to find we were being used for protecting the big corporations’ interests.

I was trained to kill but not to live.

I was trained to follow orders but to never to think for myself.

I was fooled by propaganda and thought what I was doing was right; I was wrong.

I was injured only to find nobody believed me or cared.

I ask for help, but get ignored.

I can take pills that kill but not a plant that heals for fear of reprisal.

I had friends that could take no more, and killed themselves because of the horrors they could not forgive themselves for.

I am now awake and will spread the truth as far as my voice will carry and hope others will hear the call for freedom being hollered from our own back yards.

I will be there when that call gets heard and protect the interests of Big Corporations no more.

I am proud that I was willing to protect our freedoms but saddened that protecting our freedoms is not what I was doing.

I have never forgotten that oath I took and will stand with my brothers and sisters to fight for our rights today, when the call comes.

I am a veteran. More importantly, I am your brother, sister, father, mother, neighbor, friend.

I am a veteran. My name is not important, my intentions are.

There is more to the story of a veteran than you may know. Respect that.


From: A Veteran.

Overpopulation, Fact or Fairytail?

Overpopulation, Fact or Fairytail?

Overpopulation: The Perennial Myth

“What most frequently meets our view (and occasions complaint) is our teeming population. Our numbers are burdensome to the world, which can hardly support us . . . . In very deed, pestilence, and famine, and wars, and earthquakes have to be regarded as a remedy for nations, as the means of pruning the luxuriance of the human race.”

This was not written by professional doomsayer Paul Ehrlich (The Population Bomb, 1968). It is not found in the catastrophist works of Donella and Dennis Meadows (The Limits to Growth, 1972; Beyond the Limits, 1992). Nor did it come from the Council on Environmental Quality and the Department of State’s pessimistic assessment of the world situation, The Global 2000 Report to the President (1980).

It did not even come from Thomas Malthus, whose Essay on Population (1798) in the late eighteenth century is the seminal work to which much of the modern concern about overpopulation can be traced. And it did not come from Botero, a sixteenth-century Italian whose work anticipated many of the arguments advanced by Malthus two centuries later.

The opening quotation was penned by Tertullian, a resident of the city of Carthage in the second century, when the population of the world was about 190 million, or only three to four percent of what it is today. And the fear of overpopulation did not begin with Tertullian. One finds similar concerns expressed in the writings of Plato and Aristotle in the fourth century B.C., as well as in the teachings of Confucius as early as the sixth century B.C.

From the period before Christ, men have been worried about overpopulation. Those concerns have become ever more frenzied. On an almost daily basis we are fed a barrage of stories in the newspapers and on television—complete with such appropriately lurid headlines as “Earth Near the Breaking Point” and “Population Explosion Continues Unabated”—predicting the imminent starvation of millions because population is outstripping the food supply. We regularly hear that because of population growth we are rapidly depleting our resource base with catastrophic consequences looming in our immediate future. We are constantly told that we are running out of living space and that unless something is done, and done immediately, to curb population growth, the world will be covered by a mass of humanity, with people jammed elbow to elbow and condemned to fight for each inch of space.

The catastrophists have been predicting doom and gloom for centuries. Perhaps the single most amazing thing about this perennial exercise is that the catastrophists seem never to have stopped quite long enough to notice that their predictions have never materialized. This probably says more about the catastrophists themselves than anything else. Catastrophism is characterized by intellectual arrogance. It’s been said of Thomas Malthus, for example, that he underestimated everyone’s intelligence but his own. Whenever catastrophists confront a problem for which they cannot imagine a solution, the catastrophists conclude that no one else in the world will be able to think of one either. For example, in Beyond the Limits, the Meadows tell us that crop yields, at least in the Western world, have reached their peak. Since the history of agriculture is largely a history of increasing yields per acre, one would be interested in knowing how they arrived at such a significant and counter-historical conclusion. Unfortunately, such information is not forthcoming.

Overpopulation

But isn’t the world overpopulated? Aren’t we headed toward catastrophe? Don’t more people mean less food, fewer resources, a lower standard of living, and less living space for everyone? Let’s look at the data.

As any population graph clearly shows, the world has and is experiencing a population explosion that began in the eighteenth century. Population rose sixfold in the next 200 years. But this explosion was accompanied, and in large part made possible, by a productivity explosion, a resource explosion, a food explosion, an information explosion, a communications explosion, a science explosion, and a medical explosion.

The result was that the sixfold increase in world population was dwarfed by the eighty-fold increase in world output. As real incomes rose, people were able to live healthier lives. Infant mortality rates plummeted and life expectancies soared. According to anthropologists, average life expectancy could never have been less than 20 years or the human race would not have survived. In 1900 the average world life expectancy was about 30 years. In 1993 it is just over 65 years. Nearly 80 percent of the increase in world life expectancy has taken place in just the last 90 years! That is arguably one of the single most astonishing accomplishments in the history of humanity. It is also one of the least noted.

But doesn’t this amazing accomplishment create precisely the overpopulation problem about which the catastrophists have been warning us? The data clearly show that this is not the case. “Overpopulation” cannot stand on its own. It is a relative term. Overpopulation must be overpopulation relative to something, usually food, resources, and living space. The data show that all three variables are, and have been, increasing more rapidly than population.

Food. Food production has outpaced population growth by, on average, one percent per year ever since global food data began being collected in the late 1940s. There is currently enough food to feed everyone in the world. And there is a consensus among experts that global food production could be increased dramatically if needed. The major problem for the developed countries of the world is food surpluses. In the United States, for example, millions of acres of good cropland lie unused each year. Many experts believe that even with no advances in science or technology, we currently have the capacity to feed adequately, on a sustainable basis, 40 to 50 billion people, or about eight to ten times the current world population. And we are currently at the dawn of a new agricultural revolution, biotechnology, which has the potential to increase agricultural productivity dramatically.

Where people are hungry, it is because of war (Somalia, Ethiopia) or government policies that, in the name of modernization and industrialization, penalize farmers by taxing them at prohibitive rates (e.g., Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya), not because population is exceeding the natural limits of what the world can support.

Significantly, during the decade of the 1980s, agricultural prices in the United States, in real terms, declined by 38 percent. World prices followed similar trends and today a larger proportion of the world’s people are better fed than at any time in recorded history. In short, food is becoming more abundant.

Resources. Like food, resources have become more abundant over time. Practically all resources, including energy, are cheaper now than ever before. Relative to wages, natural resource prices in the United States in 1990 were only one-half what they were in 1950, and just one-fifth their price in 1900. Prices outside the United States show similar trends.

But how can resources be getting more abundant? Resources are not things that we find in nature. It is ideas that make things resources. If we don’t know how to use something, it is not a resource. Oil is a perfect example. Prior to the 1840s oil was a liability rather than a resource. There was little use for it and it would often seep to the surface and get into the water supply. It was only with the dawn of the machine age that a use was discovered for this “slimy ooze.”

Our knowledge is even more important than the physical substance itself, and this has significant ramifications: More people mean more ideas. There is no reason, therefore, that a growing population must mean declining resource availability. Historically, the opposite has been true. Rapidly growing populations have been accompanied by rapidly declining resource prices as people have discovered new ways to use existing resources as well as uses for previously unused materials.

But an important caveat must be introduced here. For the foregoing to occur, the political and economic institutions must be right. A shortage of a good or service, including a resource, will encourage a search both for additional supplies and for substitutes. But this is so only if those who are successful are able to profit from their effort. This is precisely what classical liberalism, with its emphasis on private property and the free market, accomplishes. A shortage of a particular resource will cause its price to rise, and the lure of profit will attract entrepreneurs anxious to capitalize on the shortage by finding solutions, either additional supplies of the existing material or the development of an entirely new method of supplying the service. Communicating through the use of fiber optics rather than copper cable is a case in point.

Entrepreneurs typically have drawn scientists and others with relevant expertise into the field by paying them to work on the problem. Thus, the market automatically ensures that those most likely to find solutions to a particular problem, such as a shortage of an important resource, are drawn into positions where they can concentrate their efforts on finding solutions to the problem. To cite just a single example, a shortage of ivory for billiard balls in nineteenth-century England led to the invention of celluloid, followed by the entire panoply of plastics.

In the absence of an efficient and reliable way to match up expertise with need, our efforts are random. And in the absence of suitable rewards for satisfying the needs of society, little effort will be forthcoming. It was certainly no accident that the takeoff, both in population growth and economic growth, dates from the decline of mercantilism and extensive government economic regulations in the eighteenth century, and the emergence in the Western world of a relatively free market, characterized by private property, low taxes, and little government interference.

In every category—per capita income, life expectancy, infant mortality, cars, telephones, televisions, radios per person—the performance of the more free market countries far surpasses the more interventionist countries. The differences are far too large as well as systematic to be attributed to mere chance.

Living Space. But even if food and resources are becoming more abundant, certainly this can’t be true for living space. After all, the world is a finite place and the more people in it, the less space there is for everyone. In a statistical sense this is true, of course. But it is also irrelevant. For example, if the entire population of the world were placed in the state of Alaska, every individual would receive nearly 3,500 square feet of space, or about one-half the size of the average American family homestead with front and back yards. Alaska is a big state, but it is a mere one percent of the earth’s land mass. Less than one-half of one percent of the world’s ice-free land area is used for human settlements.

But perhaps “living space” can be measured more meaningfully by looking at such things as the number of houses, the amount of floor space, or the number of rooms per person. There are more houses, more floor space, and more rooms per person than ever before. In short, like both food and resources, living space is, by any meaningful measure, becoming more abundant.

Finally, it should be noted that the population explosion has begun to fizzle. Population growth peaked at 2.1 percent per year in the late 1960s and has declined to its present rate of 1.7 percent. There is no doubt that this trend will continue since, according to the latest information supplied by the World Health Organization, total fertility rates (the number of births per woman) have declined from 4.5 in 1970 to just 3.3 in 1990. That is exactly fifty percent of the way toward a fertility rate of 2.1, which would eventually bring population growth to a halt.

Everything is not fine. There are many problems in the world. Children are malnourished. But the point that cannot be ignored is that all of the major economic trends are in the right direction. Things are getting better.

Contrary to the constant barrage of doomsday newspaper and television stories, the data clearly show that the prospect of the Malthusian nightmare is growing steadily more remote. The natural limits of what the earth can support are steadily receding, not advancing. Population growth is slowing while the supplies of food, resources, and even living space are increasing. Moreover, World Bank data show that real wages are increasing, which means that people are actually becoming more scarce.

In short, although there are now more people in the world than ever before, by any meaningful measure the world is actually becoming relatively less populated.


David Osterfeld

Dr. Osterfeld was assistant professor of political science at Saint Joseph’s College, Rensselaer, Indiana.

 

This article was originally published on FEE.org. Read the original article.

Space Station Photos Validate Flat Earth

italy compare

Is Italy Really that big, or is it the camera lens?

The latest photos released by Tim Peake to Flickr from the International Space Station bring to mind the latest debate going on about weather or not the earth is a globe. Have a look for yourself and tell me what you see.

sainai Syria

Sinai, Syria Peninsula, again, how big should be?

cuba

Check out Cuba has grown.

space

A slite lens curve dose not make a globe.

south africa w

Shouldn’t there be a star or two or three…..

portal

How can we see no stars?

And for those that say it is because of the lighting or camera, please explain why this pic has stars, then, while the others don’t
Lookie... stars.png

No curve1

Atmospheric curve?

strait line

Really?

I don’t have the answer, and I won’t assume I know what is going on. My mind has been saturated with the lies coming to light, of late, and I, like many others, am trying to make a bit of sense of it. If you have some light to shine on the issue, please share it with us so we can put this issue to close.

I have a question for the “space stations” out there. Can you send us a non-cgi photo of the earth? I can’t seem to find one.
Thanks Pat

Your generation did not care enough to save our environment for future generations.

Your generation did not care enough to save our environment for future generations.

Checking out at the store, the young cashier suggested to the much older lady that she should bring her own grocery bags, because plastic bags are not good for the environment.
The woman apologized to the young girl and explained, “We didn’t have this ‘green thing’ back in my earlier days.”

The young clerk responded, “That’s our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment for future generations.”

The older lady said that she was right — our generation didn’t have the “green thing” in its day. The older lady went on to explain:
Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they really were recycled.

But we didn’t have the “green thing” back in our day.

Grocery stores bagged our groceries in brown paper bags that we reused for numerous things. Most memorable besides household garbage bags was the use of brown paper bags as book covers for our school books. This was to ensure that public property (the books provided for our use by the school) was not defaced by our scribblings. Then we were able to personalize our books on the brown paper bags. But, too bad we didn’t do the “green thing” back then.
We walked up stairs because we didn’t have an escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn’t climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks.

But she was right. We didn’t have the “green thing” in our day.

Back then we washed the baby’s diapers because we didn’t have the throw away kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 220 volts. Wind and solar power really did dry our clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing.

But that young lady is right; we didn’t have the “green thing” back in our day.
Back then we had one TV, or radio, in the house — not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of the state of Montana. In the kitchen we blended and stirred by hand because we didn’t have electric machines to do everything for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap. Back then, we didn’t fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn’t need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity.

But she’s right; we didn’t have the “green thing” back then.

We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blade in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull.

But we didn’t have the “green thing” back then.

Back then, people took the streetcar or a bus and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour taxi service in the family’s $45,000 SUV or van, which cost what a whole house did before the”green thing.” We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn’t need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 23,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest burger joint.

But isn’t it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn’t have the “green thing” back then?

Please forward this on to another selfish old person who needs a lesson in conservation from a smart ass young person.

We don’t like being old in the first place, so it doesn’t take much to piss us off… Especially from a tattooed, multiple pierced smart-ass who can’t make change without the cash register telling them how much.

Author unknown.